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Effects of repeated blood donations on iron status and hematologic variables of canine blood donors

Rui R. F. FerreiraDepartment of Veterinary Clinics, Institute for Biomedical Sciences of Abel Salazar, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal

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Rafael R. GopeguiDepartment of Animal Medicine and Surgery, Veterinary Faculty, Barcelona Autonomous University, 08193 Bellaterra-Barcelona, Spain

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Maria Manuela R. C. AraujoVeterinary Diagnostic Laboratory INNO, Rua Cândido de Sousa, 15, 4710-503 Braga, Portugal.

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Augusto J. F. de MatosDepartment of Veterinary Clinics and the Multidisciplinary Unit for Biomedical Research, Institute for Biomedical Sciences of Abel Salazar, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the bone marrow regenerative response and iron status of canine blood donors subjected to repeated blood collections for 1 year.

Design—Prospective cohort study.

Animals—57 blood donor dogs.

Procedures—Hematologic variables, including reticulocyte percentage, were evaluated before and 10 days after each blood collection in 16 dogs donating 13% of total blood volume (TBV) every 2 months (group 1), 16 dogs donating 13% of TBV every 3 months (group 2), and 25 dogs donating 15% of TBV every 3 months (group 3) for 1 year. Serum concentrations of iron, transferrin, and ferritin were analyzed before inclusion in the study and 10 days after the last donation.

Results—Significant increases in RBC distribution width, platelet count, WBC count, and reticulocyte percentage were detected after blood donation in all groups. Dogs of group 2 had a significantly higher serum ferritin concentration than did dogs of group 1; dogs of group 1 had a significant decrease in serum ferritin concentration. A positive correlation between the number of blood donations and both RBC distribution width and reticulocyte percentage was found for all groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—All blood donation regimens induced a bone marrow regenerative response, which was able to restore depleted blood cells within 10 days after blood donation while maintaining iron status within the calculated reference range. However, dogs donating 13% of TBV every 2 months had a significant decrease in iron stores, which suggested that iron-related variables must be monitored during prolonged blood donor programs.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the bone marrow regenerative response and iron status of canine blood donors subjected to repeated blood collections for 1 year.

Design—Prospective cohort study.

Animals—57 blood donor dogs.

Procedures—Hematologic variables, including reticulocyte percentage, were evaluated before and 10 days after each blood collection in 16 dogs donating 13% of total blood volume (TBV) every 2 months (group 1), 16 dogs donating 13% of TBV every 3 months (group 2), and 25 dogs donating 15% of TBV every 3 months (group 3) for 1 year. Serum concentrations of iron, transferrin, and ferritin were analyzed before inclusion in the study and 10 days after the last donation.

Results—Significant increases in RBC distribution width, platelet count, WBC count, and reticulocyte percentage were detected after blood donation in all groups. Dogs of group 2 had a significantly higher serum ferritin concentration than did dogs of group 1; dogs of group 1 had a significant decrease in serum ferritin concentration. A positive correlation between the number of blood donations and both RBC distribution width and reticulocyte percentage was found for all groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—All blood donation regimens induced a bone marrow regenerative response, which was able to restore depleted blood cells within 10 days after blood donation while maintaining iron status within the calculated reference range. However, dogs donating 13% of TBV every 2 months had a significant decrease in iron stores, which suggested that iron-related variables must be monitored during prolonged blood donor programs.

Contributor Notes

Supported by Instituto Português do Sangue e da Transplantação, Hospital Veterinário do Porto, and the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (grant No. SFRH/BD/43946/2008).

The authors thank Dr. Sónia Quintão for assistance with statistical analysis.

Address correspondence to Dr. Matos (ajmatos@icbas.up.pt).