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Pathology in Practice

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  • 1 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 4 Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
History

A 13-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated by a referring veterinarian because of progressive hair loss, anorexia, diarrhea, and profound weakness that developed over a period of a few weeks. The cat was referred to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of Missouri for further assessment.

Clinical and Gross Findings

On initial evaluation, the cat's mentation was obtunded and mild dehydration was evident. Severe alopecia was present on the ventral aspects of the abdomen and neck, axillae, medial aspects of the forelimbs and hind limbs, periocular region, and nasal planum (Figure 1). The

Contributor Notes

Dr. Sharpe's present address is BluePearl Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Partners, 820 Frontage Rd, Northfield, IL 60093.

Address correspondence to Dr. Kuroki (kurokik@missouri.edu).