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Associations between infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis at weaning and ultrasongraphically measured body composition traits in yearling cattle

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

Abstract

Objective—To assess associations between infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) diagnosed at weaning and production traits in yearling beef calves.

Design—Retrospective population-based cohort study.

Animals—1,882 Angus calves.

Procedures—Angus calves from 1 farm were evaluated over 7 years. The association between yearling body production traits and detection of IBK lesions at weaning was evaluated.

Results—Yearlings that had evidence of IBK at weaning had less 12th rib fat depth, ribeye area, and body weight than did cohorts without evidence of IBK. Average daily gain was greater in cattle that had IBK lesions at weaning, but this did not offset lower body weight at weaning.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The associations between IBK at weaning and production variables persisted well into the postweaning period, and there appeared to be a relationship between decreased body composition traits at yearling evaluation and IBK infection before weaning.

Abstract

Objective—To assess associations between infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) diagnosed at weaning and production traits in yearling beef calves.

Design—Retrospective population-based cohort study.

Animals—1,882 Angus calves.

Procedures—Angus calves from 1 farm were evaluated over 7 years. The association between yearling body production traits and detection of IBK lesions at weaning was evaluated.

Results—Yearlings that had evidence of IBK at weaning had less 12th rib fat depth, ribeye area, and body weight than did cohorts without evidence of IBK. Average daily gain was greater in cattle that had IBK lesions at weaning, but this did not offset lower body weight at weaning.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The associations between IBK at weaning and production variables persisted well into the postweaning period, and there appeared to be a relationship between decreased body composition traits at yearling evaluation and IBK infection before weaning.

Contributor Notes

Supported by the Iowa State University Center for Integrated Animal Genomics.

Address correspondence to Dr. O'Connor (oconnor@iastate.edu).