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Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings, 2013

Preface

The Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings has been published by the NASPHV and CDC since 2005.1 The compendium provides standardized recommendations for public health officials, veterinarians, animal venue operators, animal exhibitors, visitors to animal venues and exhibits, and others concerned with control of disease and with minimizing health risks associated with animal contact in public settings. The report has undergone several revisions, and this document substantially updates information provided in the 2011 compendium.2

Introduction

Contact with animals in public settings (eg, fairs, educational farms, petting zoos, and schools) provides

Preface

The Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings has been published by the NASPHV and CDC since 2005.1 The compendium provides standardized recommendations for public health officials, veterinarians, animal venue operators, animal exhibitors, visitors to animal venues and exhibits, and others concerned with control of disease and with minimizing health risks associated with animal contact in public settings. The report has undergone several revisions, and this document substantially updates information provided in the 2011 compendium.2

Introduction

Contact with animals in public settings (eg, fairs, educational farms, petting zoos, and schools) provides

Contributor Notes

The NASPHV Animal Contact Compendium Committee: Kirk E. Smith, DVM, PhD, (Co-Chair), Minnesota Department of Health, 625 Robert St N, Saint Paul, MN 55155; John R. Dunn, DVM, PhD, (Co-Chair), Tennessee Department of Health, 425 5th Ave N, Nashville, TN 37243; Louisa Castrodale, DVM, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, 3601 C St No. 540, Anchorage, AK 99503; Russell Daly, DVM, Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007; and Ron Wohrle, DVM, Washington State Department of Health, PO Box 47853, Olympia, WA 98504. Consultants to the Committee: Casey Barton Behravesh, MS, DVM, DrPH, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA 33033; Karen Beck, DVM, PhD, North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, 2 W Edenton St, Raleigh, NC 27601; Marla J. Calico, International Association of Fairs and Expositions, 3043 E Cairo, Springfield, MO 65802; Allan Hogue, DVM, USDA, 4700 River Rd, Riverdale Park, MD 20737; Christine Hahn, MD, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, Idaho Division of Public Health, 450 W State St, Boise, ID 83720; Thomas Hairgrove, DVM, American Association of Extension Veterinarians, Kleberg Center, Room 133, 2471 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843; Thomas P. Meehan, DVM, Association of Zoos and Aquariums, 8403 Colesville Rd, Ste 710, Silver Spring, MD 20910; and Kendra Stauffer, DVM, AVMA Council on Public Health and Regulatory Veterinary Medicine, 1931 N Meacham Rd, Schaumburg, IL 60173.

This article has not undergone peer review; opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the AVMA.

Address correspondence to Dr. Smith (kirk.smith@state.mn.us).