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Evaluation of risk factors associated with recurrent obstruction in cats treated medically for urethral obstruction

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  • 1 Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital, 20 Cabot Rd, Woburn, MA 01801.
  • | 2 Bulger Veterinary Referral Hospital, 247 Chickering Rd, North Andover, MA 01845.
  • | 3 Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital, 215 Commerce Way, Ste 100, Portsmouth, NH 03801.
  • | 4 Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital, 20 Cabot Rd, Woburn, MA 01801.
  • | 5 Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital, 20 Cabot Rd, Woburn, MA 01801.
  • | 6 Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital, 20 Cabot Rd, Woburn, MA 01801.
  • | 7 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Clark Science Center, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063.
  • | 8 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Clark Science Center, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063.

Abstract

Objective—To determine risk factors for short-term recurrent urethral obstruction in cats after treatment by means of urinary catheterization and hospitalization.

Design—Prospective case series.

Animals—83 client-owned cats.

Procedures—Physical examination findings, laboratory abnormalities, treatment decisions, and environmental changes were evaluated as risk factors for recurrent urethral obstruction in the 30 days following hospital discharge.

Results—Of the 68 cats with completed follow-up surveys, 10 had an episode of recurrent urethral obstruction. Older cats were significantly more likely to have recurrent urethral obstruction. No specific laboratory abnormalities were associated with the risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. Longer duration of catheterization was significantly associated with a decreased risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. Duration of hospitalization and volume of IV fluids delivered were not significantly associated with recurrent urethral obstruction. Increasing water availability after discharge was associated with a decreased risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. There was no association between diet and recurrent urethral obstruction.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggested that longer duration of catheterization may be associated with a lower probability of short-term recurrent urethral obstruction in male cats. Older cats were at higher risk for recurrent obstruction. Owners should be encouraged to increase water availability after discharge in cats treated for urethral obstruction to decrease the likelihood of recurrence.

Abstract

Objective—To determine risk factors for short-term recurrent urethral obstruction in cats after treatment by means of urinary catheterization and hospitalization.

Design—Prospective case series.

Animals—83 client-owned cats.

Procedures—Physical examination findings, laboratory abnormalities, treatment decisions, and environmental changes were evaluated as risk factors for recurrent urethral obstruction in the 30 days following hospital discharge.

Results—Of the 68 cats with completed follow-up surveys, 10 had an episode of recurrent urethral obstruction. Older cats were significantly more likely to have recurrent urethral obstruction. No specific laboratory abnormalities were associated with the risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. Longer duration of catheterization was significantly associated with a decreased risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. Duration of hospitalization and volume of IV fluids delivered were not significantly associated with recurrent urethral obstruction. Increasing water availability after discharge was associated with a decreased risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. There was no association between diet and recurrent urethral obstruction.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggested that longer duration of catheterization may be associated with a lower probability of short-term recurrent urethral obstruction in male cats. Older cats were at higher risk for recurrent obstruction. Owners should be encouraged to increase water availability after discharge in cats treated for urethral obstruction to decrease the likelihood of recurrence.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Waldrop's present address is Animal Critical Care and Emergency Service, 11536 Lake City Way NE, Seattle, WA 98125.

Dr. Horton's present address is the Department of Mathematics, Amherst College, Amherst, MA 01002.

Presented in abstract form at the 17th International Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Symposium, Nashville, Tenn, September 2011.

Address correspondence to Dr. Eisenberg (betheisen@gmail.com).