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Serial serum feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity concentrations and prognostic variables in 33 cats with pancreatitis

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  • 1 Small Animal Clinic Haar, Keferloher Str 25, Haar 85540, Germany.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculteit der Diergeneeskunde, University of Utrecht, 3508 TD Utrecht, Netherlands.
  • | 3 Small Animal Clinic Haar, Keferloher Str 25, Haar 85540, Germany.
  • | 4 Vet Med Laboratory, Division of IDEXX Laboratories, Ludwigsburg, 71636 Ludwigsburg, Germany.
  • | 5 Small Animal Clinic Haar, Keferloher Str 25, Haar 85540, Germany.
  • | 6 Small Animal Clinic Haar, Keferloher Str 25, Haar 85540, Germany.
  • | 7 Gastrointestinal Laboratory, Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

Abstract

Objective—To identify factors significantly associated with prognosis in cats hospitalized because of pancreatitis.

Design—Prospective case series.

Animals—33 cats hospitalized for treatment of pancreatitis (diagnosis determined on the basis of clinical signs and serum feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity [fPLI] concentration ≥ 5.4 μg/L).

Procedures—Cats were hospitalized (day 1) for 2 to 16 days and observed for 44 days or until they died or were euthanized. Results of physical examination and hematologic and serum biochemical analysis, including measurement of serum fPLI concentration, performed on the day of hospital admission were analyzed to determine whether they were associated with outcome (ie, survival to at least 44 days vs death or euthanasia).

Results—On day 1, mean × SD serum fPLI concentration among the 33 cats was 22.0 × 16.4 μg/L. Mean age of the cats was 12.7 × 3.8 years (range, 4 to 19 years). Eleven of the 33 (33%) cats died or were euthanized before day 44. In univariate analyses, dyspnea, hypothermia, hypokalemia, hyperkalemia, and serum fPLI concentration were significantly associated with an adverse outcome. However, in a multivariate analysis, only severe dyspnea, hyperkalemia (potassium concentration > 5.5 mmol/L), and serum fPLI concentration at the time of hospital admission were found to be significantly associated with an adverse outcome.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that dyspnea, hyperkalemia, and serum fPLI concentration at the time of hospital admission were significant prognostic factors for cats hospitalized because of pancreatitis.

Abstract

Objective—To identify factors significantly associated with prognosis in cats hospitalized because of pancreatitis.

Design—Prospective case series.

Animals—33 cats hospitalized for treatment of pancreatitis (diagnosis determined on the basis of clinical signs and serum feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity [fPLI] concentration ≥ 5.4 μg/L).

Procedures—Cats were hospitalized (day 1) for 2 to 16 days and observed for 44 days or until they died or were euthanized. Results of physical examination and hematologic and serum biochemical analysis, including measurement of serum fPLI concentration, performed on the day of hospital admission were analyzed to determine whether they were associated with outcome (ie, survival to at least 44 days vs death or euthanasia).

Results—On day 1, mean × SD serum fPLI concentration among the 33 cats was 22.0 × 16.4 μg/L. Mean age of the cats was 12.7 × 3.8 years (range, 4 to 19 years). Eleven of the 33 (33%) cats died or were euthanized before day 44. In univariate analyses, dyspnea, hypothermia, hypokalemia, hyperkalemia, and serum fPLI concentration were significantly associated with an adverse outcome. However, in a multivariate analysis, only severe dyspnea, hyperkalemia (potassium concentration > 5.5 mmol/L), and serum fPLI concentration at the time of hospital admission were found to be significantly associated with an adverse outcome.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that dyspnea, hyperkalemia, and serum fPLI concentration at the time of hospital admission were significant prognostic factors for cats hospitalized because of pancreatitis.

Contributor Notes

Presented in abstract form at the Annual Veterinary Congress of the German Veterinary Medical Association (DVG), Dusseldorf, Germany, October 2012.

Address correspondence to Dr. Stockhaus (Stockhaus@tierklinik-haar.de).