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Costs of raccoon rabies incidents in cattle herds in Hampshire County, West Virginia, and Guernsey County, Ohio

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  • 1 USDA, APHIS, Wildlife Services, National Rabies Management Program, 59 Chenell Dr, Ste 2, Concord, NH 03301
  • | 2 USDA, APHIS, Wildlife Services, National Wildlife Research Center, 4101 LaPorte Ave, Fort Collins, CO 80521
  • | 3 USDA, APHIS, Wildlife Services, National Wildlife Research Center, 4101 LaPorte Ave, Fort Collins, CO 80521
  • | 4 School of Business, University at Albany, Albany, NY 12222
  • | 5 West Virginia Department of Agriculture, PO Box 239, Moorefield, WV 26835
  • | 6 College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210
  • | 7 USDA, APHIS, Wildlife Services, National Rabies Management Program, 59 Chenell Dr, Ste 2, Concord, NH 03301
  • | 8 Rabies Program, NCEZID/DHCPP/Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, CDC, Mail Stop G-33, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30333
  • | 9 USDA, APHIS, Wildlife Services, National Rabies Management Program, 59 Chenell Dr, Ste 2, Concord, NH 03301

Abstract

Objective—To determine direct and indirect costs associated with raccoon rabies incidents involving cattle herds in Hampshire County, WV, in 2008 and Guernsey County, Ohio, in 2010.

Design—Ex post cost analysis.

Animals—1 cattle herd in Hampshire County, WV, in 2008 and 1 cattle herd in Guernsey County, Ohio, in 2010.

Procedures—Data were collected for each incident through telephone and email interviews with 16 federal, state, and county agency personnel involved in the case investigations and coordinated responses for rabies in the cattle herds. To characterize the economic impact associated with rabies in the 2 cattle herds, cost analysis was conducted with 7 cost variables (salary and benefits for personnel involved in the response, human postexposure prophylaxis, indirect patient costs, rabies diagnostic testing, cattle carcass disposal, market value of euthanized cattle, and enhanced rabies surveillance). Estimates of direct costs were determined on the basis of agency records and other relevant data obtained from notes and reports made by agency staff at the time of the incident and from a review of the literature.

Results—Primary costs included the market value of euthanized cattle ($51,461 in West Virginia; $12,561 in Ohio), human postexposure prophylaxis ($17,959 in West Virginia; $11,297 in Ohio), and salary and benefits for personnel involved in the response ($19,792 in West Virginia; $14,496 in Ohio).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These results should provide a basis for better characterization of the economic impact of wildlife rabies in cattle in the United States.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Rupprecht's present address is the Global Alliance for Rabies Control, 529 Humboldt St, Ste 1, Manhattan, KS 66502.

The authors thank Rachel Radcliff, Christopher Croson, Sam Mills, Kevin Sullivan, Judith Cox, Terry Mayhew, Vickie Medlin, Dr. Kathy Smith, Todd Smith, Andy Montoney, John Seman, Josh Hoblet, Dr. Tony Forshey, Andrea Geilinger, Rose Ball, Dr. Skip Oertli, Jesse Blanton, Dr. Bruce Wagner, Dr. Chuck Fossler, and Dr. Jason Lombard for providing data and technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Mr. Chipman (richard.b.chipman@aphis.usda.gov).