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Preparing veterinarians for work in resource-poor settings

Thomas W. Graham DVM, MPVM, PhD1, Joyce Turk MS2, John McDermott DVM, PhD3, and Corrie Brown DVM, PhD, DACVP4,5
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  • 1 Veterinarians Without Borders, 1124 Pistachio Ct, Davis, CA 95618
  • | 2 Bureau of Food Security, US Agency for International Development, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20523
  • | 3 Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research, International Food Policy Research Institute, 2033 K St NW, No. 400, Washington, DC 20006
  • | 4 Veterinarians Without Borders, 1124 Pistachio Ct, Davis, CA 95618
  • | 5 Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Food and nutrition security is achieved when food is adequate (in terms of quantity, quality, safety, and sociocultural acceptability) to live a healthy and active life and is available for, accessible to, and satisfactorily used by all individuals at all times.1 Globally, animal health professionals have a key role in promoting food security and enhancing human well-being by keeping food-producing animals healthy. The importance of this task was highlighted recently in a commentary2 published in the JAVMA in which the authors clearly articulated global needs to ensure food security and the importance of including

Contributor Notes

Presented in part at the 149th Annual Convention of the American Veterinary Medical Association, San Diego, August 2012.

The authors thank Jessica Kania and Alexandra Baker for technical assistance.

For all commentaries, views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy of the AVMA.

Address correspondence to Dr. Graham (tgraham@dcn.org).