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Clinical manifestations, response to treatment, and clinical outcome for Weimaraners with hypertrophic osteodystrophy: 53 cases (2009–2011)

Noa SafraDepartment of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California-Davis, Davis CA 95616.

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Eric G. JohnsonDepartment of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis CA 95616.

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Lisa LitSchool of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Animal Science, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis CA 95616.

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Oded ForemanJackson Laboratory, 4910 Raley Blvd, Sacramento, CA 95838.

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Zena T. WolfDepartment of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California-Davis, Davis CA 95616.

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Miriam AguilarDepartment of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California-Davis, Davis CA 95616.

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Nili KarmiDepartment of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California-Davis, Davis CA 95616.

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Carrie J. FinnoDepartment of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California-Davis, Davis CA 95616.

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Danika L. BannaschDepartment of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California-Davis, Davis CA 95616.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate clinical manifestations, response to treatment, and outcome for Weimaraners with hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—53 dogs.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for signalment, vaccination history, clinical signs, laboratory test results, response to treatment, and relapses. Radiographs were reviewed.

Results—Clinical signs included pyrexia, lethargy, and ostealgia; signs involving the gastrointestinal, ocular, or cutaneous systems were detected. Of the 53 dogs, 28 (52.8%) had HOD-affected littermates. Dogs with HOD-affected littermates were more likely to relapse, compared with the likelihood of relapse for dogs with no HOD-affected littermates. All 53 dogs had been vaccinated 1 to 30 days before HOD onset; no difference was found between the number of dogs with a history of vaccination with a recombinant vaccine (n … 21) versus a nonrecombinant vaccine (32). Fifty (94.3%) dogs had radiographic lesions compatible with HOD at disease onset, and the other 3 (5.7%) had HOD lesions 48 to 72 hours after the onset of clinical signs. Twelve of 22 (54.5%) dogs treated with NSAIDs did not achieve remission by 7 days after initiation of treatment. All dogs treated initially with corticosteroids achieved remission within 8 to 48 hours. Of the 33 dogs that reached adulthood, 28 (84.8%) were healthy and 5 (15.2%) had episodes of pyrexia and malaise.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Treatment with corticosteroids was superior to treatment with NSAIDs in Weimaraners with HOD. It may be necessary to evaluate repeated radiographs to establish a diagnosis of HOD. Most HOD-affected Weimaraners had resolution of the condition with physeal closure.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate clinical manifestations, response to treatment, and outcome for Weimaraners with hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—53 dogs.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for signalment, vaccination history, clinical signs, laboratory test results, response to treatment, and relapses. Radiographs were reviewed.

Results—Clinical signs included pyrexia, lethargy, and ostealgia; signs involving the gastrointestinal, ocular, or cutaneous systems were detected. Of the 53 dogs, 28 (52.8%) had HOD-affected littermates. Dogs with HOD-affected littermates were more likely to relapse, compared with the likelihood of relapse for dogs with no HOD-affected littermates. All 53 dogs had been vaccinated 1 to 30 days before HOD onset; no difference was found between the number of dogs with a history of vaccination with a recombinant vaccine (n … 21) versus a nonrecombinant vaccine (32). Fifty (94.3%) dogs had radiographic lesions compatible with HOD at disease onset, and the other 3 (5.7%) had HOD lesions 48 to 72 hours after the onset of clinical signs. Twelve of 22 (54.5%) dogs treated with NSAIDs did not achieve remission by 7 days after initiation of treatment. All dogs treated initially with corticosteroids achieved remission within 8 to 48 hours. Of the 33 dogs that reached adulthood, 28 (84.8%) were healthy and 5 (15.2%) had episodes of pyrexia and malaise.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Treatment with corticosteroids was superior to treatment with NSAIDs in Weimaraners with HOD. It may be necessary to evaluate repeated radiographs to establish a diagnosis of HOD. Most HOD-affected Weimaraners had resolution of the condition with physeal closure.

Contributor Notes

Supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health–National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (No. 1R21AI090277–01) awarded to Dr. Bannasch, a grant from the Morris Animal Foundation (No. D10CA-404) awarded to Dr. Safra, the Weimaraner Club of America, and the Weimaraner Foundation Fund.

Address correspondence to Dr. Safra (nsafra@ucdavis.edu).