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Evaluation of a point-of-care portable analyzer for measurement of plasma immunoglobulin G, total protein, and albumin concentrations in ill neonatal foals

David M. Wong DVM, MS, DACVIM, DACVECC1, Steeve Giguère DVM, PhD, DACVIM2, and Mara A. Wendel DVM3
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  • 1 Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center, Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
  • | 2 Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.
  • | 3 Section of Internal Medicine, Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital, 2150 Georgetown Rd, Lexington, KY 40511.

Abstract

Objective—To compare the diagnostic performance of a point-of-care (POC) analyzer with that of established methods for the measurement of plasma IgG, total protein, and albumin concentrations in neonatal foals.

Design—Evaluation study.

Animals—100 neonatal foals < 7 days of age.

Procedures—Plasma IgG, total protein, and albumin concentrations were measured with a POC analyzer via an immunoturbidimetric method. Corresponding measurements of plasma IgG, total protein, and albumin concentrations were measured by means of automated biochemical analyzers via automated immunoturbidimetric, biuret, and bromocresol green dye–binding assays, respectively (standard laboratory methods).

Results—The sensitivity and specificity of the POC analyzer for detection of failure of passive transfer of immunity (FPTI) in foals were 80.7% and 100%, respectively, when FPTI was defined as a plasma IgG concentration < 400 mg/dL and were 75.9% and 100%, respectively, when FPTI was defined as a plasma IgG concentration < 800 mg/dL. The POC analyzer overestimated plasma albumin concentrations and, to a lesser extent, plasma total protein concentrations, compared with values determined with the standard laboratory methods.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested the POC analyzer was acceptable for determination of plasma IgG and total protein concentrations in ill foals. The POC analyzer overestimated plasma albumin concentration such that its use was clinically unacceptable for the determination of that concentration. The POC analyzer provided timely measurements of plasma IgG concentrations, which is necessary information for the assessment of passive transfer of maternal antibodies to neonatal foals.

Abstract

Objective—To compare the diagnostic performance of a point-of-care (POC) analyzer with that of established methods for the measurement of plasma IgG, total protein, and albumin concentrations in neonatal foals.

Design—Evaluation study.

Animals—100 neonatal foals < 7 days of age.

Procedures—Plasma IgG, total protein, and albumin concentrations were measured with a POC analyzer via an immunoturbidimetric method. Corresponding measurements of plasma IgG, total protein, and albumin concentrations were measured by means of automated biochemical analyzers via automated immunoturbidimetric, biuret, and bromocresol green dye–binding assays, respectively (standard laboratory methods).

Results—The sensitivity and specificity of the POC analyzer for detection of failure of passive transfer of immunity (FPTI) in foals were 80.7% and 100%, respectively, when FPTI was defined as a plasma IgG concentration < 400 mg/dL and were 75.9% and 100%, respectively, when FPTI was defined as a plasma IgG concentration < 800 mg/dL. The POC analyzer overestimated plasma albumin concentrations and, to a lesser extent, plasma total protein concentrations, compared with values determined with the standard laboratory methods.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested the POC analyzer was acceptable for determination of plasma IgG and total protein concentrations in ill foals. The POC analyzer overestimated plasma albumin concentration such that its use was clinically unacceptable for the determination of that concentration. The POC analyzer provided timely measurements of plasma IgG concentrations, which is necessary information for the assessment of passive transfer of maternal antibodies to neonatal foals.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Giguère's present address is Department of Large Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

No extrainstitutional funding was used to support this study.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest in regard to this study.

The authors thank Elliott Williams for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Wong (dwong@iastate.edu).