• 1. Spangler WL, Culbertson MR. Prevalence and type of splenic diseases in cats: 455 cases (1985–1991). J Am Vet Med Assoc 1992; 201: 773776.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Skeldon NCA, Gerber KL, Wilson RJ, et al. Mastocytemia in cats: prevalence, detection and quantification methods, haematological association, and potential implications in 30 cats with mast cell tumours. J Feline Med Surg 2010; 12: 960966.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Lamm CG, Stern AW, Smith AJ, et al. Disseminated cutaneous mast cell tumors with epitheliotropism and systemic mastocytosis in a domestic cat. J Vet Invest 2009; 21: 710715.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4. Rogers KS. Mast cell tumors: dilemmas of diagnosis and treatment. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 1996; 26: 87102.

  • 5. Rassnick KM, Williams LE, Kristal O, et al. Lomustine for treatment of mast cell tumors in cats: 38 cases (1999–2005). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2008; 232: 12001205.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Dank G, Chien MB, London CA. Activating mutations in the catalytic or juxtamembrane domain of c-kit in splenic mast cell tumors of cats. Am J Vet Res 2002; 63: 11291133.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7. Hanson JA, Papageorges M, Girard E, et al. Ultrasonagraphic appearance of splenic disease in 101 cats. Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2001; 42: 441445.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Litster AL, Sorenmo KU. Characterization of the signalment, clinical and survival characteristics of 41 cats with mast cell neoplasia. J Feline Med Surg 2006; 8: 177183.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Pathology in Practice

Joanna E. Hyland DVM1, Eva A. Sartin DVM, PhD, DACVP2, and Elizabeth A. Spangler DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVP3
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.
  • | 2 Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.
  • | 3 Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.
History

An 8-year-old spayed female domestic longhair cat was referred to Auburn University Small Animal Teaching Hospital for evaluation of abdominal distension. Two years earlier, a diagnosis of chronic renal failure had been made, and the cat was receiving fluids SC every 2 weeks. Three weeks prior to the referral evaluation, the owners noted the development of abdominal distension and that the cat had decreased appetite, activity, and frequency of bowel movements.

Clinical and Gross Findings

On physical examination, the cat was quiet and lethargic and had signs of depression; the eyes were sunken, and pinching the skin resulted in

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Hyland (jzh0035@tigermail.auburn.edu).