• 1. White SD, Bourdeau PJ, Meredith A. Dermatologic problems in guinea pigs. Compend Contin Educ Pract Vet 2003; 25:690697.

  • 2. Meredith A. Skin diseases of rodents. In Pract 2010; 32:1621.

  • 3. O'Rourke D. Disease problems of guinea pigs. In: Queensbury KE, Carpenter JW, eds. Ferrets, rabbits and rodents: clinical medicine and surgery. 2nd ed. St Louis: Saunders, 2004;245254.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4. Rothwell TLW, Pope SE, Collins GH. Trixacarus caviae infection of guinea pigs with genetically determined differences in susceptibility to Trichostrongylus colubriformis infection. Int J Parasitol 1989; 19:347348.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Rothwell TL, Pope SE, Rajczyk ZK, et al. Haematological and pathological responses to experimental Trixacarus caviae infection in guinea pigs. J Comp Pathol 1991; 104:179185.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Ellis C, Mori M. Skin diseases of rodents and small exotic mammals. Vet Clin North Am Exotic Anim Pract 2001; 4:531539.

  • 7. Dorrestein GM, van Bronswijk JEMH. Trixacarus caviae Fain, Howell & Hyatt 1972 (Acari: Sarcoptidae) as a cause of mange in guinea-pigs and papular urticaria in man. Vet Parasitol 1979; 5:389398.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Hawkins MG, Graham JE. Emergency and critical care of rodents. Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract 2007; 10:501531.

  • 9. Richardson VCG. The skin. In: Richardson VCG, ed. Diseases of domestic guinea pigs. Oxford, England: Blackwell Science Ltd, 2000;113.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10. Beck W, Wrieg HH. Mange in guinea pigs caused by Trixacarus caviae (Acari: Sarcoptidae)—biology of Trixacarus caviae, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment [in German]. Kleintierpraxis 1998; 43:703708.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11. Donnelley TM. Trixacarus caviae infection. Lab Anim 2004; 33:2223.

  • 12. Thoday KL, Beresford-Jones WP. The diagnosis and treatment of mange in the guinea-pig caused by Trixacarus (Caviacoptes) caviae (Fain, Hovell & Hyatt, 1972). J Small Anim Pract 1977; 18:591595.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13. Heath ACG, Bishop DM. Treatment of mange in guinea pigs, hamsters and hedgehogs (lett). N Z Vet J 1984; 32:120.

  • 14. Ackerman L. Trixacarus caviae infestation in a guinea pig. Can Vet J 1987; 28:613.

  • 15. Zenoble RD, Greve JH. Sarcoptid mite infestation in a colony of guinea pigs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1980; 177:898900.

  • 16. Hansen KA, Tengnagel LFD. Mange mite infestation of guinea pigs caused by Trixacarus (Caviacoptes) caviae: diagnosis and therapy. Eur J Comp Anim Pract 1992; 2:2122.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17. Harvey RG. Use of ivermectin for guinea pig mange (lett). Vet Rec 1987; 120:351.

  • 18. Hollmann P, Hollmann B. Hints for the treatment of guinea pig mange [in German]. Fachpraxis 2002; 42:1011.

  • 19. McKellar QA, Midgley DM, Galbraith EA, et al. Clinical and pharmacological properties of ivermectin in rabbits and guinea pigs. Vet Rec 1992; 130:7173.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20. Webb RA. Ivermectin in guinea pigs (lett). Vet Rec 1992; 130:307.

  • 21. Richardson V. Ivermectin in guinea pigs (lett; Erratum published in Vet Rec 1992; 130:456). Vet Rec 1992; 130:432.

  • 22. Perraki M, Saridomichelakis M, Koutinas C, et al. A case of Trixacarus caviae mange in a guinea pig (Cavia porcellus). J Hell Vet Med Soc 2002; 53:352357.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23. Sireli M, Sagmanligil V, Cetin N, et al. Electrocardiographic changes induced by ivermectin in guinea pigs. Scand J Lab Anim Sci 2008; 35:4552.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 24. Mandigers PJ, van der Hage MH, Westerhof I, et al. A field study of the efficacy of ivermectin in propylene glycol in the treatment of mange in guinea pigs [in Dutch]. Tijdschr Diergeneeskd 1993; 118:4246.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25. Shipstone M. Trixacarus caviae infestation in a guinea pig: failure to respond to ivermectin administration. Aust Vet Pract 1997; 27:143146.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26. Fisher M, Beck W, Hutchinson MJ. Efficacy and safety of selamectin (Stronghold/Revolution) used off-label in exotic pets. Int J Appl Res Vet Med 2007; 5:8796.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 27. Sarasola P, Jernigan AD, Walker DK, et al. Pharmacokinetics of selamectin following intravenous, oral and topical administration in cats and dogs. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 2002; 25:265272.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 28. Beck W. Common endo- and ectoparasitic diseases in small mammals—clinical feature, diagnosis and treatment. A review of the literature and own experiences [in German]. Tierärztl Prax 2004; 32:311321.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 29. Honda M, Namikawa K, Hirata H, et al. An outbreak of Trixacarus caviae infestation of guinea pigs at an animal petting facility and an evaluation of the safety and suitable dose of selamectin treatment. J Parasitol 2011; 97:731734.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Comparison of efficacy, safety, and convenience of selamectin versus ivermectin for treatment of Trixacarus caviae mange in pet guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus)

David Eshar DVM, DABVP1 and Tali Bdolah-Abram MSc2
View More View Less
  • 1 VetExotics, 24 Hareches St, Kefar HaOranim, Israel.
  • | 2 School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the efficacy and safety of topical administration of selamectin and to compare selamectin treatment with a common ivermectin protocol for the treatment of natural infestation with Trixacarus caviae in pet guinea pigs.

Design—Clinical trial.

Animals—17 mixed-breed pet guinea pigs with active mite infestation.

Procedures—Guinea pigs were randomly allocated to receive a single dose of selamectin topically (15 mg/kg [6.8 mg/lb]) or ivermectin (400 μg/kg [181.8 μg/lb], SC) every 10 days for 4 injections. Microscopic examination of skin scrapings from all animals was performed at 10-day intervals for 60 days, and the presence of mites or mite eggs was recorded. The efficacies of the 2 treatment protocols were compared at every time point.

Results—Pruritus resolved by day 10 in all animals. Animals were microscopically mite-free on days 30 and 40 in the selamectin and ivermectin treatment groups, respectively, but groups did not differ significantly in regard to the number of mite-positive animals at any timepoint. Recurrence of infection was not noted in either treatment group. No adverse reactions were observed in any of the treated animals.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that a single topical application of selamectin at a dose of 15 mg/kg or repeated SC injection of ivermectin at a dose of 400 μg/kg can eliminate T caviae mites from guinea pigs within 30 and 40 days, respectively. Although effectiveness did not significantly differ between the 2 treatments, the convenience associated with the single topical dose of selamectin made it a preferable treatment modality for both patients and owners.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the efficacy and safety of topical administration of selamectin and to compare selamectin treatment with a common ivermectin protocol for the treatment of natural infestation with Trixacarus caviae in pet guinea pigs.

Design—Clinical trial.

Animals—17 mixed-breed pet guinea pigs with active mite infestation.

Procedures—Guinea pigs were randomly allocated to receive a single dose of selamectin topically (15 mg/kg [6.8 mg/lb]) or ivermectin (400 μg/kg [181.8 μg/lb], SC) every 10 days for 4 injections. Microscopic examination of skin scrapings from all animals was performed at 10-day intervals for 60 days, and the presence of mites or mite eggs was recorded. The efficacies of the 2 treatment protocols were compared at every time point.

Results—Pruritus resolved by day 10 in all animals. Animals were microscopically mite-free on days 30 and 40 in the selamectin and ivermectin treatment groups, respectively, but groups did not differ significantly in regard to the number of mite-positive animals at any timepoint. Recurrence of infection was not noted in either treatment group. No adverse reactions were observed in any of the treated animals.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that a single topical application of selamectin at a dose of 15 mg/kg or repeated SC injection of ivermectin at a dose of 400 μg/kg can eliminate T caviae mites from guinea pigs within 30 and 40 days, respectively. Although effectiveness did not significantly differ between the 2 treatments, the convenience associated with the single topical dose of selamectin made it a preferable treatment modality for both patients and owners.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Eshar's present address is Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

Address correspondence to Dr. Eshar (deshar@vet.k-state.edu).