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Use of propofol for induction of anesthesia in dogs undergoing definitive radiation therapy: 31 cases (2006–2009)

Todd M. Erfourth DVM1, Elizabeth A. McNiel DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVR2, Michael A. Scott DVM, PhD, DACVP3, and Deborah V. Wilson DVM, DACVA4
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  • 1 Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences and Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 2 Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences and Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 3 Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences and Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 4 Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences and Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate changes in serial hemograms and serum biochemical profiles in tumor-bearing dogs undergoing daily anesthesia with propofol as an induction agent for radiation therapy.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—31 dogs with cutaneous or subcutaneous malignancies over the trunk or limbs.

Procedures—Radiation therapy consisted of 18 daily treatments administered Monday through Friday over a period of 24 days. Propofol was administered IV to effect for induction of anesthesia. Complete blood count and serum biochemical data were generated at the beginning, middle, and end of radiation therapy and compared to identify changes over time via either a repeated-measures ANOVA or Friedman test.

Results—Leukocyte and platelet parameters did not differ significantly over time. Calculated Hct, erythrocyte count, hemoglobin concentration, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration decreased overtime, whereas mean corpuscular volume increased overtime.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs receiving propofol for induction of anesthesia and radiation therapy had a decrease in RBC count, although these changes were not determined to be of clinical importance in this patient population. The cause of these alterations was not immediately apparent. Propofol appeared to be a safe choice for induction of anesthesia in dogs during daily radiation therapy.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Erfourth's present address is Pittsburgh Veterinary Speciality and Emergency Center, 807 Camp Horne Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15237.

Dr. McNiel's present address is Tufts Medical Center Molecular Oncology Research Institute, 800 Washington St, Ste 5609, Boston, MA 02111.

This study was performed at Michigan State University.

Presented in part at the Annual Meeting of the Veterinary Cancer Society, Austin, Tex, October 2009.

Address correspondence to Dr. McNiel (elizabeth.mcniel@tufts.edu).