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Use of pleural access ports for treatment of recurrent pneumothorax in two dogs

Alane Kosanovich Cahalane DVM, DACVS1 and James A. Flanders DVM, DACVS2
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  • 1 Peace Avenue Veterinary Clinic, G/F, 7B Liberty Ave, Mongkok, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

Abstract

Case Description—An 8-year-old castrated male mixed-breed dog (dog 1) and a 13-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog (dog 2) were evaluated because of spontaneous pneumothorax.

Clinical Findings—Both dogs had decreased bronchovesicular sounds with coughing, tachypnea, cyanosis, lethargy, or a combination of these clinical signs. Radiographic examination revealed pneumothorax in both dogs and consolidation of a lung lobe in dog 2. Pneumothorax was alleviated following thoracocentesis in both dogs but recurred.

Treatment and Outcome—Dog 1 was initially treated by placement of a thoracostomy tube but underwent thoracotomy when pneumothorax recurred after tube removal; left caudal lung lobectomy was performed because a ruptured bulla was suspected, and a pulmonary bulla was histologically confirmed. Dog 2 underwent thoracotomy with left caudal lung lobectomy and partial removal of the left cranial lung lobe; diffuse pulmonary emphysema was diagnosed. This dog underwent a second surgery for right caudal lung lobectomy because of torsion. When pneumothorax recurred and additional surgery was not considered feasible, pleural access ports were placed in both dogs for repeated removal of air from the thoracic cavity. Ports were used clinically for 17 days in dog 1 and 14 days in dog 2. Dog 1 successfully underwent another surgery when pneumothorax recurred 18 days after port placement but was euthanized 17 months later when dyspnea and tachypnea recurred. Pneumothorax had not recurred further in dog 2 twenty-three months after port placement.

Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that pleural access ports may have a role in the management of spontaneous pneumothorax in dogs.

Abstract

Case Description—An 8-year-old castrated male mixed-breed dog (dog 1) and a 13-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog (dog 2) were evaluated because of spontaneous pneumothorax.

Clinical Findings—Both dogs had decreased bronchovesicular sounds with coughing, tachypnea, cyanosis, lethargy, or a combination of these clinical signs. Radiographic examination revealed pneumothorax in both dogs and consolidation of a lung lobe in dog 2. Pneumothorax was alleviated following thoracocentesis in both dogs but recurred.

Treatment and Outcome—Dog 1 was initially treated by placement of a thoracostomy tube but underwent thoracotomy when pneumothorax recurred after tube removal; left caudal lung lobectomy was performed because a ruptured bulla was suspected, and a pulmonary bulla was histologically confirmed. Dog 2 underwent thoracotomy with left caudal lung lobectomy and partial removal of the left cranial lung lobe; diffuse pulmonary emphysema was diagnosed. This dog underwent a second surgery for right caudal lung lobectomy because of torsion. When pneumothorax recurred and additional surgery was not considered feasible, pleural access ports were placed in both dogs for repeated removal of air from the thoracic cavity. Ports were used clinically for 17 days in dog 1 and 14 days in dog 2. Dog 1 successfully underwent another surgery when pneumothorax recurred 18 days after port placement but was euthanized 17 months later when dyspnea and tachypnea recurred. Pneumothorax had not recurred further in dog 2 twenty-three months after port placement.

Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that pleural access ports may have a role in the management of spontaneous pneumothorax in dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Cahalane (akcahalane@yahoo.com).