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Bilateral lumbar hernias in a domestic shorthair cat

Shelly J. Olin DVM1, Shannon P. Holmes DVM, MSc, DACVR2, Ashley Jeffs DVM3, and Karen K. Cornell DVM, PhD, DACVS4
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30605.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30605.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30605.
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30605.

Abstract

Case Description—A 2.8-kg (6.1-lb) 4-month-old sexually intact female domestic shorthair cat was referred for evaluation of bilateral, subcutaneous lumbar masses that were presumed to be the kidneys.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination findings included 2 mobile, nonpainful, 3×3-cm, bilaterally symmetric masses in the dorsolateral lumbar region. Abdominal radiography, ultrasonography, and CT confirmed bilateral body wall defects with renal herniation. Serum biochemistry profile, urinalysis, and excretory urography confirmed normal renal function.

Treatment and Outcome—Exploratory laparotomy, reduction of the kidneys, repair of the body wall defects, bilateral nephropexy, and ovariohysterectomy were performed. There were no perioperative complications.

Clinical Relevance—Lumbar hernia has not been reported previously in a cat. It is important for veterinarians to be aware that although rare, lumbar hernia should be included in the list of differential diagnoses for a lumbar mass or signs of chronic lumbar pain in cats.

Abstract

Case Description—A 2.8-kg (6.1-lb) 4-month-old sexually intact female domestic shorthair cat was referred for evaluation of bilateral, subcutaneous lumbar masses that were presumed to be the kidneys.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination findings included 2 mobile, nonpainful, 3×3-cm, bilaterally symmetric masses in the dorsolateral lumbar region. Abdominal radiography, ultrasonography, and CT confirmed bilateral body wall defects with renal herniation. Serum biochemistry profile, urinalysis, and excretory urography confirmed normal renal function.

Treatment and Outcome—Exploratory laparotomy, reduction of the kidneys, repair of the body wall defects, bilateral nephropexy, and ovariohysterectomy were performed. There were no perioperative complications.

Clinical Relevance—Lumbar hernia has not been reported previously in a cat. It is important for veterinarians to be aware that although rare, lumbar hernia should be included in the list of differential diagnoses for a lumbar mass or signs of chronic lumbar pain in cats.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Olin's present address is Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Dr. Jeffs' present address is Delta Lake Veterinary Hospital, 8723 Turin Rd, Rome, NY 13440.

The authors thank Dr. Stephanie Hill for her referral of this case.

Address correspondence to Dr. Cornell (cornell@uga.edu).