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Assessment of commercial diets and recipes for home-prepared diets recommended for dogs with cancer

Cailin R. Heinze VMD, MS, DACVN1, Frank C. Gomez BS2, and Lisa M. Freeman DVM, PhD, DACVN3
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Cancer is becoming increasingly common in both human and veterinary medicine. In the United States, it has been reported that cancer accounts for approximately 1 in 4 human deaths. One in 2 men and 1 in 3 women will develop cancer during their lifetime.1 Similarly, cancer is the leading cause of death in dogs > 2 years old, and in some breeds, such as Golden Retrievers, the rate of death attributable to cancer is > 50%.2

Diet can alter cancer risk in humans and laboratory animals, and many investigators are exploring nutritional strategies to prevent cancer as

Contributor Notes

Presented as a poster at the 12th Annual American Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Clinical Nutrition and Research Symposium, New Orleans, May 2012.

Address correspondence to Dr. Heinze (cailin.heinze@tufts.edu).