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Pathology in Practice

Jane Ashley Stuckey DVM1, Christina J. Ramirez DVM, PhD2, Linda M. Berent DVM, PhD, DACVP3, and Keiichi Kuroki DVM, PhD, DACVP4
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  • 1 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 4 Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
History

A 4.5-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated at the University of Missouri Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital emergency service because of acute ataxia that progressed to recumbency and decreased responsiveness. The cat was housed at a local car mechanic garage and was last observed to behave normally 9 hours prior to the evaluation. Previous medical history was unremarkable, and no medications were being administered to the cat.

Clinical and Clinicopathologic Findings

Upon examination, the cat was assessed as 7% dehydrated, laterally recumbent, and minimally responsive, with a rectal temperature of 35.6°C (96.1°F). Both third eyelids were prolapsed; no

History

A 4.5-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated at the University of Missouri Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital emergency service because of acute ataxia that progressed to recumbency and decreased responsiveness. The cat was housed at a local car mechanic garage and was last observed to behave normally 9 hours prior to the evaluation. Previous medical history was unremarkable, and no medications were being administered to the cat.

Clinical and Clinicopathologic Findings

Upon examination, the cat was assessed as 7% dehydrated, laterally recumbent, and minimally responsive, with a rectal temperature of 35.6°C (96.1°F). Both third eyelids were prolapsed; no

Contributor Notes

Dr. Stuckey's present address is Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

Address correspondence to Dr. Kuroki (kurokik@missouri.edu).