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Effect of oral administration of pimobendan in cats with heart failure

Sonya G. GordonDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.
Michael E. DeBakey Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Ashley B. SaundersDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.
Michael E. DeBakey Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Risa M. RolandDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Randolph L. WinterDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Lori DrourrDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Sarah E. AchenDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Crystal D. HariuDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Ryan C. FriesDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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May M. BoggessDepartment of Mathematics, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Matthew W. MillerDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.
Michael E. DeBakey Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of PO administration of pimobendan on clinical and echocardiographic variables and survival time in cats with heart failure characterized by ventricular systolic dysfunction.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—27 client-owned cats (16 male and 11 female) with heart failure, treated with pimobendan (mean ± SD dosage, 0.26 ± 0.08 mg/kg [0.118 ± 0.036 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h).

Procedures—Information on medical history, laboratory results, diagnostic imaging findings, treatments received, and survival time were obtained from medical records of cats that received pimobendan because of cardiac disease. When possible, additional follow-up information was obtained through telephone interviews with referring veterinarians and owners.

Results—The mean ± SD age of all 27 cats was 8.9 ± 5.2 years. All cats had received several cardiac medications. Types of heart disease represented included unclassified cardiomyopathy (CM; n = 11 [41%]), dilated CM (8 [30%]), arrhythmogenic right ventricular CM (4 [15%]), congenital heart disease (3 [11 %]), and hypertrophic CM with regional hypokinesis (1 [4%]). All cats had ventricular systolic dysfunction. One cat with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve became severely hypotensive after initial administration of pimobendan and was excluded from the survival analysis. Median survival time was 167 days (95% confidence interval, 32 to 339 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Pimobendan appeared to be well tolerated in cats with heart failure characterized by ventricular systolic dysfunction of various etiologies. Cats with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve may develop systemic hypotension when treated with pimobendan. Additional studies are needed to establish dosages for pimobendan and its effects before it can be recommended for treatment of cats with CHF.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of PO administration of pimobendan on clinical and echocardiographic variables and survival time in cats with heart failure characterized by ventricular systolic dysfunction.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—27 client-owned cats (16 male and 11 female) with heart failure, treated with pimobendan (mean ± SD dosage, 0.26 ± 0.08 mg/kg [0.118 ± 0.036 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h).

Procedures—Information on medical history, laboratory results, diagnostic imaging findings, treatments received, and survival time were obtained from medical records of cats that received pimobendan because of cardiac disease. When possible, additional follow-up information was obtained through telephone interviews with referring veterinarians and owners.

Results—The mean ± SD age of all 27 cats was 8.9 ± 5.2 years. All cats had received several cardiac medications. Types of heart disease represented included unclassified cardiomyopathy (CM; n = 11 [41%]), dilated CM (8 [30%]), arrhythmogenic right ventricular CM (4 [15%]), congenital heart disease (3 [11 %]), and hypertrophic CM with regional hypokinesis (1 [4%]). All cats had ventricular systolic dysfunction. One cat with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve became severely hypotensive after initial administration of pimobendan and was excluded from the survival analysis. Median survival time was 167 days (95% confidence interval, 32 to 339 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Pimobendan appeared to be well tolerated in cats with heart failure characterized by ventricular systolic dysfunction of various etiologies. Cats with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve may develop systemic hypotension when treated with pimobendan. Additional studies are needed to establish dosages for pimobendan and its effects before it can be recommended for treatment of cats with CHF.

Contributor Notes

Presented in abstract form at the 18th Annual European College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Congress, Ghent, Belgium, September 2008, and at the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum, Anaheim, Calif, June 2010.

Address correspondence to Dr. Gordon (sgordon@cvm.tamu.edu.