Treatment of dematiaceous fungal keratitis in a dog

Jonathan D. Pucket Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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Rachel A. Allbaugh Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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Amy J. Rankin Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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Abstract

Case Description—A 9-year-old castrated male Bichon Frise was evaluated because of a 3-week history of a nonhealing corneal ulcer and corneal pigmentation of the left eye.

Clinical Findings—Ophthalmic examination of the left eye revealed conjunctival hyperemia, corneal neovascularization, corneal edema, corneal ulceration, and central corneal pigmentation. Intraocular structures of the left eye could not be visually examined because of the diffuse nature of the corneal lesions. The right eye had anterior cortical incipient cataracts, nuclear sclerosis, and an inactive chorioretinal scar.

Treatment and Outcome—Superficial lamellar keratectomy of the left eye was performed for both therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Histologic evaluation of corneal biopsy specimens revealed dematiaceous fungal keratitis of the left eye, and topical administration of voriconazole was used to successfully resolve the keratitis. Seven months after diagnosis of dematiaceous fungal keratitis, the dog had no clinical signs or history of recurrence of the keratitis.

Clinical Relevance—Dematiaceous fungal keratitis should be considered as a possible cause of nonhealing corneal ulceration with heavy pigment deposition in dogs. Results suggested that lamellar keratectomy along with topical administration of voriconazole can be used successfully to treat dematiaceous fungal keratitis in dogs.

Abstract

Case Description—A 9-year-old castrated male Bichon Frise was evaluated because of a 3-week history of a nonhealing corneal ulcer and corneal pigmentation of the left eye.

Clinical Findings—Ophthalmic examination of the left eye revealed conjunctival hyperemia, corneal neovascularization, corneal edema, corneal ulceration, and central corneal pigmentation. Intraocular structures of the left eye could not be visually examined because of the diffuse nature of the corneal lesions. The right eye had anterior cortical incipient cataracts, nuclear sclerosis, and an inactive chorioretinal scar.

Treatment and Outcome—Superficial lamellar keratectomy of the left eye was performed for both therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Histologic evaluation of corneal biopsy specimens revealed dematiaceous fungal keratitis of the left eye, and topical administration of voriconazole was used to successfully resolve the keratitis. Seven months after diagnosis of dematiaceous fungal keratitis, the dog had no clinical signs or history of recurrence of the keratitis.

Clinical Relevance—Dematiaceous fungal keratitis should be considered as a possible cause of nonhealing corneal ulceration with heavy pigment deposition in dogs. Results suggested that lamellar keratectomy along with topical administration of voriconazole can be used successfully to treat dematiaceous fungal keratitis in dogs.

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