• 1.

    Lattimer JC, Crowin LA Jr, Stapleton J, et al. Clinical and clinicopathologic response of canine bone tumor dogs to treatment with 153Sm-EDTMP. J Nucl Med 1990; 31:13161325.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Barnard SM, Zuber RM, Moore AS. Samarium Sm 153 lexidronam for the palliative treatment of dogs with primary bone tumors: 35 cases (1999–2005). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2007; 12:18771881.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Ginel PJ, Novales M, Molleda JM, et al. Mandibular fibroblastic osteosarcoma in a three-month-old dog. Vet Rec 1996; 139:120121.

  • 4.

    Mouatt JG, Straw RC. Use of mandibular symphysiotomy to allow extensive caudal hemimaxillectomy in a dog. Aust Vet J 2002; 80:272276.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Brogdon JD, Brightman AH, Helper LC, et al. Parosteal osteosarcoma of the mandible in a dog. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1989; 194:10791081.

  • 6.

    Heyman SJ, Diefenderfer DL, Goldschmidt MH, et al. Canine axial skeletal osteosarcoma: a retrospective study of 116 cases (1986–1989). Vet Surg 1992; 21:304310.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Dickerson ME, Page RL, LaDue TA, et al. Retrospective analysis of axial skeleton osteosarcoma in 22 large-breed dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001; 15:120124.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Hammer AS, Weeren FR, Weisbrode SE, et al. Prognostic factors in dogs with osteosarcomas of the flat or irregular bones. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1995; 31:321326.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Beck JA, Strizek AA. Full-thickness resection of the hard palate for treatment of osteosarcoma in a dog. Aust Vet J 1999; 77:163165.

  • 10.

    Hardy WD Jr, Brodey RS, Riser WH. Osteosarcoma of the canine skull. Vet Radiol Ultrasound 1967; 8:5.

  • 11.

    Straw RC, LeCouteur RA, Powers BE, et al. Multilobular osteochondrosarcoma of the canine skull: 16 cases (1978–1988). J Am Vet Med Assoc 1989; 195:17641769.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Vancil JM, Henry CJ. Skull tumors. In: Henry CJ, Higginbotham ML, eds. Cancer management in small animal practice. Maryland Heights, Mo: Saunders Elsevier, 2010; 219225.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Dernell WS, Straw RC, Cooper MF, et al. Multilobular osteochondrosarcoma in 39 dogs: 1979–1993. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 34:1118.

  • 14.

    Mouatt JG. Acrylic cranioplasty and axial pattern flap following calvarial and cerebral mass excision in a dog. Aust Vet J 2002; 80:211215.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15.

    Straw RC, Powers BE, Klausner J, et al. Canine mandibular osteosarcoma: 51 cases (1980–1992). J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1996; 32:257262.

  • 16.

    Bittetto V, Patnaik AK, Schrader, SC, et al. Osteosarcoma in cats: 22 cases (1974–1984). J Am Vet Med Assoc 1987; 1:9193.

  • 17.

    Ciekot, PA, Powers BE, Withrow SJ, et al. Histologically low-grade, yet biologically high-grade, fibrosarcomas of the mandible and maxilla in dogs: 25 cases (1982–1991). J Am Vet Med Assoc 1994; 204:610615.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Aas M, Moe L, Gamlem H, et al. internal radionuclide therapy of primary osteosarcoma in dogs, using 153Sm-ethylene-diamino-tetramethylene-phosphonate (EDTMP). Clin Cancer Res 1999; 5(suppl 10):3148s3152s.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    Moe L, Boysen M, Aas M, et al. Maxillectomy and targeted radionuclide therapy with 153sm-edtmp in a recurrent canine osteosarcoma. J Small Anim Pract 1996; 37:241246.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    Clifford CA, Fischetti AJ, Goggin JM, et al. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In: Henry CJ, Higginbotham ML, eds. Cancer management in small animal practice. Maryland Heights, Mo: Saunders Elsevier, 2010; 8389.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21.

    Huda W, Slone R. Magnetic resonance. In: Review of radiologic physics. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2003; 192202.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22.

    Schwarz PD, Withrow SJ, et al. Partial maxillary resection as a treatment for oral cancer in 61 dogs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1995; 27:617624.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Use of samarium Sm 153 lexidronam for the treatment of dogs with primary tumors of the skull: 20 cases (1986–2006)

Jarrod M. Vancil DVM, DACVIM1, Carolyn J. Henry DVM, MS, DACVIM2,3, Rowan J. Milner BVSc, MMedVet, DACVIM4, Amber M. McCoig DVM1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8, Jimmy C. Lattimer DVM, MS, DACVR5, Jose Armando Villamil DVM, PhD6, Dudley L. McCaw DVM, DACVIM7, and Jeffrey N. Bryan DVM, PhD, DACVIM8
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Division of Hematology and Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.
  • | 5 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 7 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 8 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate samarium Sm 153 lexidronam (153Sm-EDTMP) as a treatment option for dogs with bony tumors of the skull.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—Dogs with multilobular osteochondrosarcoma (MLO) or osteosarcoma (OSA) of the skull.

Procedures—Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital records from the Universities of Missouri and Florida from 1986 to 2006 were searched for dogs with primary skull tumors treated with 153Sm-EDTMP.

Results—25 dogs were initially evaluated, with 5 dogs subsequently excluded because of inadequate follow-up or unrelated death. Seven OSAs and 13 MLOs were diagnosed. Tumors involved the occipital and frontal bones (n = 10), zygomatic arch and maxilla region (6), palate (3), and mandible (1). No clinically important adverse effects related to 153Sm-EDTMP treatment were documented. Of the 20 dogs evaluated 21 days after injection with 153Sm-EDTMP, 4 had subjective improvement, 13 had progressive disease, and 3 had insufficient follow-up. On the basis of radiographic findings, metastasis was suspected in 1 dog; 16 dogs had no metastasis evident, and medical records were insufficient for 3 dogs. Survival time, defined as the 153Sm-EDTMP injection date to the date of death, ranged from 3 to 1,314 days (median, 144 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The subjective improvement in 4 patients and lack of clinical evidence of adverse effects suggested that 153Sm-EDTMP injection may be an option for the treatment of dogs with MLO or OSA of the skull when other treatments have failed or surgery is not possible.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate samarium Sm 153 lexidronam (153Sm-EDTMP) as a treatment option for dogs with bony tumors of the skull.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—Dogs with multilobular osteochondrosarcoma (MLO) or osteosarcoma (OSA) of the skull.

Procedures—Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital records from the Universities of Missouri and Florida from 1986 to 2006 were searched for dogs with primary skull tumors treated with 153Sm-EDTMP.

Results—25 dogs were initially evaluated, with 5 dogs subsequently excluded because of inadequate follow-up or unrelated death. Seven OSAs and 13 MLOs were diagnosed. Tumors involved the occipital and frontal bones (n = 10), zygomatic arch and maxilla region (6), palate (3), and mandible (1). No clinically important adverse effects related to 153Sm-EDTMP treatment were documented. Of the 20 dogs evaluated 21 days after injection with 153Sm-EDTMP, 4 had subjective improvement, 13 had progressive disease, and 3 had insufficient follow-up. On the basis of radiographic findings, metastasis was suspected in 1 dog; 16 dogs had no metastasis evident, and medical records were insufficient for 3 dogs. Survival time, defined as the 153Sm-EDTMP injection date to the date of death, ranged from 3 to 1,314 days (median, 144 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The subjective improvement in 4 patients and lack of clinical evidence of adverse effects suggested that 153Sm-EDTMP injection may be an option for the treatment of dogs with MLO or OSA of the skull when other treatments have failed or surgery is not possible.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Vancil's present address is Veterinary Cancer Group, 5040 Convoy St, San Diego, CA 92111.

Dr. Villamil's present address is Animal Cancer Care Clinic, 1122 NE 4th Ave, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33304.

Dr. McCaw's present address is Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

Presented in part at the the 24th Annual Conference of the Veterinary Cancer Society, Kansas City, Mo, November 2004.

Address correspondence to Dr. Vancil (jvancil@vetcancergroup.com).