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Comparison of short-term complication rates between dogs and cats undergoing appositional single-layer or inverting double-layer cystotomy closure: 144 cases (1993–2010)

Kelley M. Thieman-MankinDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Medical Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.

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Gary W. EllisonDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Medical Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.

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Cynthia J. JeyapaulDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Medical Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.

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Carmen S. Glotfelty-OrtizDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Medical Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.

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Abstract

Objective—To compare short-term complication rates in dogs and cats undergoing cystotomy closure by use of an inverting double-layer pattern (group I) versus cystotomy closure by use of an appositional single-layer pattern (group A).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—144 client-owned dogs and cats that underwent cystotomy between 1993 and 2010.

Procedures—Information on signalment, reason for cystotomy, method of cystotomy closure, complications that developed during hospitalization, and duration of hospitalization were obtained from the medical record. The effect of closure technique on short-term complication rate and duration of hospitalization was examined.

Results—2 of the 144 animals developed dehiscence and uroabdomen following cystotomy closure: 1 from group A and 1 from group I. Of group A animals, 29 of 79 (37%) developed minor complications such as hematuria and dysuria. Of group I animals, 33 of 65 (50%) developed the same complications. Group A and group I animals did not differ significantly with regard to prevalence of minor or major complications. The mean duration of hospitalization was 4.1 days and did not differ significantly between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—An appositional single-layer suture pattern for cystotomy closure was a safe and effective procedure with minimal risk of urine leakage and a short-term complication rate of 37%. The appositional single-layer suture pattern for cystotomy closure may be recommended for clinical use because the inverting double-layer suture pattern offered no clear advantage.

Abstract

Objective—To compare short-term complication rates in dogs and cats undergoing cystotomy closure by use of an inverting double-layer pattern (group I) versus cystotomy closure by use of an appositional single-layer pattern (group A).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—144 client-owned dogs and cats that underwent cystotomy between 1993 and 2010.

Procedures—Information on signalment, reason for cystotomy, method of cystotomy closure, complications that developed during hospitalization, and duration of hospitalization were obtained from the medical record. The effect of closure technique on short-term complication rate and duration of hospitalization was examined.

Results—2 of the 144 animals developed dehiscence and uroabdomen following cystotomy closure: 1 from group A and 1 from group I. Of group A animals, 29 of 79 (37%) developed minor complications such as hematuria and dysuria. Of group I animals, 33 of 65 (50%) developed the same complications. Group A and group I animals did not differ significantly with regard to prevalence of minor or major complications. The mean duration of hospitalization was 4.1 days and did not differ significantly between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—An appositional single-layer suture pattern for cystotomy closure was a safe and effective procedure with minimal risk of urine leakage and a short-term complication rate of 37%. The appositional single-layer suture pattern for cystotomy closure may be recommended for clinical use because the inverting double-layer suture pattern offered no clear advantage.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Thieman's present address is Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

Address correspondence to Dr. Thieman-Mankin (KThieman@cvm.tamu.edu).