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Identification of the most common cutaneous neoplasms in dogs and evaluation of breed and age distributions for selected neoplasms

J. Armando Villamil DVM, PhD1, Carolyn J. Henry DVM, MS, DACVIM2,3, Jeffrey N. Bryan DVM, PhD, DACVIM4,5, Mark Ellersieck PhD6,7, Loren Schultz DVM, PhD, DACVIM8, Jeff W. Tyler DVM, MPVM, PhD, DACVIM9, and Allen W. Hahn DVM, DACVIM10
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Hematology/Oncology Division, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 4 University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211; and the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 6 Agriculture Experimental Station, College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources
  • | 7 Agriculture Experimental Station, College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 8 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 9 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 10 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Abstract

Objective—To identify the most common cutaneous neoplasms in dogs and evaluate breed and age distributions for selected neoplasms.

Design—Retrospective epidemiological study.

Sample—Records available through the Veterinary Medical Database of dogs examined at veterinary teaching hospitals in North America between 1964 and 2002.

Procedures—Information on tumor type and patient breed and age was collected. Incidence and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated.

Results—Records of 1,139,616 dogs were reviewed. Cutaneous neoplasms were diagnosed in 25,996 of these dogs; records for the remaining 1,113,620 dogs did not indicate that cutaneous neoplasms had been diagnosed, and these dogs were considered controls. The most frequent age range for dogs with cutaneous neoplasms was 10 to 15 years. Lipoma, adenoma, and mast cell tumor were the most common skin tumor types.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results supported previously reported data regarding cutaneous neoplasia in dogs but provided updated information on the most common skin tumors and on age and breed distributions.

Abstract

Objective—To identify the most common cutaneous neoplasms in dogs and evaluate breed and age distributions for selected neoplasms.

Design—Retrospective epidemiological study.

Sample—Records available through the Veterinary Medical Database of dogs examined at veterinary teaching hospitals in North America between 1964 and 2002.

Procedures—Information on tumor type and patient breed and age was collected. Incidence and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated.

Results—Records of 1,139,616 dogs were reviewed. Cutaneous neoplasms were diagnosed in 25,996 of these dogs; records for the remaining 1,113,620 dogs did not indicate that cutaneous neoplasms had been diagnosed, and these dogs were considered controls. The most frequent age range for dogs with cutaneous neoplasms was 10 to 15 years. Lipoma, adenoma, and mast cell tumor were the most common skin tumor types.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results supported previously reported data regarding cutaneous neoplasia in dogs but provided updated information on the most common skin tumors and on age and breed distributions.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Villamil's present address is Animal Cancer Care Clinic, 1122 NE 4th Ave, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33304.

This manuscript represents a portion of a dissertation submitted by the senior author to the University of Missouri Graduate School as partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Dr. Villamil was supported by a Minority Bio-Medical Researchers Training Initiative MU/NIH Science Education Partnership Award, University of Missouri. Drs. Villamil and Henry were supported by the Tom and Betty Scott Endowed Program in Veterinary Oncology, University of Missouri. Dr. Bryan was supported by the National Library of Medicine Biomedical and Health Informatics Research training grant 2-T15-LM07089.

Presented in abstract form at the 26th Annual Veterinary Cancer Society Conference, Pine Mountain, Ga, October 2006.

The authors thank Kate Anderson and Mathew Keeler for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Villamil (drarmando@animalcancercareclinic.com).

Deceased.