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What Is Your Diagnosis?

Theresa L. Ollivett DVM1, Gillian A. Perkins DVM, DACVIM2, and Margret S. Thompson DVM, DACVR3
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850.
History

A 5-week-old female Holstein calf was evaluated for acute respiratory distress. At the farm, the calf had a 1-day history of labored breathing and signs of anxiety. No known trauma or treatment for prior respiratory disease was reported.

On evaluation, the calf had moderate signs of distress with a notable honking noise during respiration, tachypnea (respiratory rate, 60 breaths/min), tachycardia (heart rate, 180 beats/min), reduced nasal airflow, and palpably enlarged costochondral junctions of the third to sixth ribs on the left side. An emergency tracheotomy was performed but failed to alleviate the signs of distress. Upper airway endoscopy revealed

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Dr. Sean McDonough for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Ollivett (tlo7@cornell.edu).