Effect of management, marketing, and certified health programs on the sale price of beef calves sold through a livestock video auction service from 1995 through 2009

Jon T. Seeger Pfizer Animal Health, Pfizer Incorporated, 5 Giralda Farms, Madison, NJ 07940.

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Michael E. King King Data Services, 222 N 2nd St, Osage City, KS 66523.

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Dale M. Grotelueschen Pfizer Animal Health, Pfizer Incorporated, 5 Giralda Farms, Madison, NJ 07940.

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Glenn M. Rogers Pfizer Animal Health, Pfizer Incorporated, 5 Giralda Farms, Madison, NJ 07940.

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Gerald S. Stokka Pfizer Animal Health, Pfizer Incorporated, 5 Giralda Farms, Madison, NJ 07940.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate and update the previously quantified effects of management, marketing, and certified health programs on the sale price of beef calves sold through a livestock video auction service.

Design—Longitudinal study.

Sample—41,657 lots representing 5,042,272 beef calves sold from 1995 through 2009.

Procedures—Data describing each lot of beef calves marketed from 1995 through 2009 by a livestock video auction service were obtained from sale catalogues. For each year of the study, multiple regression analysis was used to quantify the effect of management, marketing, and certified health programs on sale price.

Results—Sale date, base sale weight, quadratic effect of base weight, sex of calf, region of origin, breed description, inclusion in a certified health program, and number of calves in the lot significantly affected sale price for every year of the study. Variation in body weight, flesh score, and number of days between sale and delivery date had significant effects on price in most of the years; frame score and calves with horns affected price in 7 of 15 years; age and source verification influenced sale price in every year since source verification was introduced in 2005; and the auction service's progressive genetics program increased price during the 1 year that program was available.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Some management, marketing, and certified health initiatives have consistently increased the sale price of beef calves, and producers can increase the price of their calves by implementing these practices.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate and update the previously quantified effects of management, marketing, and certified health programs on the sale price of beef calves sold through a livestock video auction service.

Design—Longitudinal study.

Sample—41,657 lots representing 5,042,272 beef calves sold from 1995 through 2009.

Procedures—Data describing each lot of beef calves marketed from 1995 through 2009 by a livestock video auction service were obtained from sale catalogues. For each year of the study, multiple regression analysis was used to quantify the effect of management, marketing, and certified health programs on sale price.

Results—Sale date, base sale weight, quadratic effect of base weight, sex of calf, region of origin, breed description, inclusion in a certified health program, and number of calves in the lot significantly affected sale price for every year of the study. Variation in body weight, flesh score, and number of days between sale and delivery date had significant effects on price in most of the years; frame score and calves with horns affected price in 7 of 15 years; age and source verification influenced sale price in every year since source verification was introduced in 2005; and the auction service's progressive genetics program increased price during the 1 year that program was available.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Some management, marketing, and certified health initiatives have consistently increased the sale price of beef calves, and producers can increase the price of their calves by implementing these practices.

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