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Cystic endometrial hyperplasia and chronic endometritis in a chinchilla

Hilary J. Granson DVM1, Anthony P. Carr Dr med vet, DACVIM2, Dennilyn Parker DVM, MVeTSc, DABVP3, and Jennifer L. Davies DVM, MVeTSc, DACVP4
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4, Canada.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4, Canada.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4, Canada.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Pathology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4, Canada.

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-year-old nulliparous sexually intact female chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) was evaluated because of a 2-month history of blood being sporadically observed in its cage.

Clinical Findings—Results of physical examination of the chinchilla were unremarkable except for the presence of blood-stained fur around the perineum. There were no external lesions to account for the bleeding. Findings on urinalysis, bacteriologic culture of urine, and whole-body radiography were unremarkable. The chinchilla's littermate had been evaluated because of similar clinical signs 2 years earlier, and these signs resolved following ovariohysterectomy.

Treatment and Outcome—Ovariohysterectomy was performed, and gross changes were not observed in the reproductive tract. However, microscopic examination revealed multifocal cystic dilation of the endometrial glands, foci of microhemorrhage, and chronic suppurative inflammation consistent with a final diagnosis of cystic endometrial hyperplasia and chronic endometritis. Clinical signs did not recur.

Clinical Relevance—Cystic endometrial hyperplasia has been documented in a variety of animals, but to the authors' knowledge, this was the first reported case in a chinchilla. Cystic endometrial hyperplasia and chronic endometritis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in an adult sexually intact female chinchilla with a history of suspected hemorrhagic vaginal discharge, suspected hematuria, or hemorrhage from an unknown source.

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-year-old nulliparous sexually intact female chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) was evaluated because of a 2-month history of blood being sporadically observed in its cage.

Clinical Findings—Results of physical examination of the chinchilla were unremarkable except for the presence of blood-stained fur around the perineum. There were no external lesions to account for the bleeding. Findings on urinalysis, bacteriologic culture of urine, and whole-body radiography were unremarkable. The chinchilla's littermate had been evaluated because of similar clinical signs 2 years earlier, and these signs resolved following ovariohysterectomy.

Treatment and Outcome—Ovariohysterectomy was performed, and gross changes were not observed in the reproductive tract. However, microscopic examination revealed multifocal cystic dilation of the endometrial glands, foci of microhemorrhage, and chronic suppurative inflammation consistent with a final diagnosis of cystic endometrial hyperplasia and chronic endometritis. Clinical signs did not recur.

Clinical Relevance—Cystic endometrial hyperplasia has been documented in a variety of animals, but to the authors' knowledge, this was the first reported case in a chinchilla. Cystic endometrial hyperplasia and chronic endometritis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in an adult sexually intact female chinchilla with a history of suspected hemorrhagic vaginal discharge, suspected hematuria, or hemorrhage from an unknown source.

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Dr. Alexandra Rauch for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Granson (hgranson@yahoo.com).