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Radical excision with five-centimeter margins for treatment of feline injection-site sarcomas: 91 cases (1998–2002)

Holly A. Phelps DVM1,2, Charles A. Kuntz DVM, MS, DACVS3, Rowan J. Milner BVSc, MMed Vet, DACVIM4, Barbara E. Powers DVM, PhD, DACVP5, and Nicholas J. Bacon MA, vetMB, DACVS6
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.
  • | 2 Commonwealth Specialty Surgery for Animals, 6651 Backlick Rd, Springfield, VA 24150.
  • | 3 Commonwealth Specialty Surgery for Animals, 6651 Backlick Rd, Springfield, VA 24150.
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.
  • | 5 Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 6 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate outcomes of radical excision of feline injection-site sarcomas (ISS) via assessment of local recurrence and metastasis rates, survival times, and complications associated with surgery.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—91 cats with ISS.

Procedures—Medical records of cats that had radical excision of ISS without adjunctive treatment were reviewed. Information extracted included sex, type of surgical procedure, histologic tumor grade, tumor diameter, time from tumor detection to definitive surgery, complications associated with surgery, whether tumors recurred locally or metastasized, and survival times. Diagnosis of ISS was histologically confirmed, and additional follow-up was performed.

Results—Overall median survival time was 901 days. Thirteen of 91 (14%) cats had local tumor recurrence; 18 (20%) cats had evidence of metastasis after surgery. Median survival time of cats with and without recurrence was 499 and 1,461 days, respectively. Median survival time of cats with and without metastasis was 388 and 1,528 days, respectively. Tumor recurrence and metastasis were significantly associated with survival time, whereas other examined variables were not. Major complications occurred in 10 cats, including 7 with incisional dehiscence.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Radical excision of ISS resulted in a metastasis rate similar to rates reported previously; the local recurrence rate appeared to be substantially less than rates reported after less aggressive surgeries, with or without adjuvant treatment. Major complication rates were similar to rates reported previously after aggressive surgical resection of ISS. Radical excision may be a valuable means of attaining an improved outcome in the treatment of feline ISS.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate outcomes of radical excision of feline injection-site sarcomas (ISS) via assessment of local recurrence and metastasis rates, survival times, and complications associated with surgery.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—91 cats with ISS.

Procedures—Medical records of cats that had radical excision of ISS without adjunctive treatment were reviewed. Information extracted included sex, type of surgical procedure, histologic tumor grade, tumor diameter, time from tumor detection to definitive surgery, complications associated with surgery, whether tumors recurred locally or metastasized, and survival times. Diagnosis of ISS was histologically confirmed, and additional follow-up was performed.

Results—Overall median survival time was 901 days. Thirteen of 91 (14%) cats had local tumor recurrence; 18 (20%) cats had evidence of metastasis after surgery. Median survival time of cats with and without recurrence was 499 and 1,461 days, respectively. Median survival time of cats with and without metastasis was 388 and 1,528 days, respectively. Tumor recurrence and metastasis were significantly associated with survival time, whereas other examined variables were not. Major complications occurred in 10 cats, including 7 with incisional dehiscence.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Radical excision of ISS resulted in a metastasis rate similar to rates reported previously; the local recurrence rate appeared to be substantially less than rates reported after less aggressive surgeries, with or without adjuvant treatment. Major complication rates were similar to rates reported previously after aggressive surgical resection of ISS. Radical excision may be a valuable means of attaining an improved outcome in the treatment of feline ISS.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Phelps' present address is Midwest Veterinary Referral Center, 17497 N Outer 40, Chesterfield, MO 63005.

Dr. Kuntz's present address is Southpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals, 3 Roper St, Moorabbin, VIC 3189, Australia.

Presented in abstract form at the American College of Veterinary Surgeons Annual Symposium, Washington, DC, October 2009.

Address correspondence to Dr. Bacon (BaconN@vetmed.ufl.edu).