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Evaluation of the effects of bovine hemoglobin glutamer-200 on systolic arterial blood pressure in hypotensive cats: 44 cases (1997–2008)

Conni E. WehausenAnimal Emergency Clinic, 1163 Helmo Ave N, Oakdale, MN 55128

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Rebecca KirbyAnimal Emergency Center and Specialty Services, 2100 W Silver Spring Dr, Glendale, WI 53209.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of bovine hemoglobin glutamer-200 (Hb-200) solution on systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) in hypotensive cats and describe potential adverse effects associated with this treatment.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—44 cats.

Procedures—Medical records of hypotensive (Doppler SAP ≤ 80 mm Hg) cats that received Hb-200 treatment were reviewed. Volume and rate of Hb-200 administration, treatments for hypotension given prior to Hb-200 administration, changes in SAP, potential adverse effects, and short-term outcome were evaluated.

Results—44 cats were included in the study. Mean ± SD SAP prior to Hb-200 administration was 52 ± 11 mm Hg, despite other treatments. Forty-three cats received Hb-200 via IV bolus administration (mean ± SD volume, 3.1 ± 2.2 mL/kg [1.41 ± 1.0 mL/lb] over 25.17 ± 17.51 minutes); 1 cat received a continuous rate infusion (CRI) only. The SAP increased to > 80 mm Hg in 33 of 44 (75%) cats. The SAP increased > 20 mm Hg above baseline value in 29 of these 33 cats and in 4 cats in which SAP did not exceed 80 mm Hg. A CRI (mean ± SD rate, 0.8 ± 0.5 mL/kg/h [0.36 ± 0.23 mL/lb/h]) of Hb-200 was administered to 37 cats (after bolus infusion in 36). Mean SAP during the CRI was 92 ± 18 mm Hg. Adverse effects included respiratory changes (n = 8 cats), vomiting (2), and pigmented serum (30). Seventeen (39%) cats survived to discharge from the hospital, 6 died, and 21 were euthanized.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hb-200 effectively increased SAP in hypotensive cats with few adverse effects.

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of bovine hemoglobin glutamer-200 (Hb-200) solution on systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) in hypotensive cats and describe potential adverse effects associated with this treatment.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—44 cats.

Procedures—Medical records of hypotensive (Doppler SAP ≤ 80 mm Hg) cats that received Hb-200 treatment were reviewed. Volume and rate of Hb-200 administration, treatments for hypotension given prior to Hb-200 administration, changes in SAP, potential adverse effects, and short-term outcome were evaluated.

Results—44 cats were included in the study. Mean ± SD SAP prior to Hb-200 administration was 52 ± 11 mm Hg, despite other treatments. Forty-three cats received Hb-200 via IV bolus administration (mean ± SD volume, 3.1 ± 2.2 mL/kg [1.41 ± 1.0 mL/lb] over 25.17 ± 17.51 minutes); 1 cat received a continuous rate infusion (CRI) only. The SAP increased to > 80 mm Hg in 33 of 44 (75%) cats. The SAP increased > 20 mm Hg above baseline value in 29 of these 33 cats and in 4 cats in which SAP did not exceed 80 mm Hg. A CRI (mean ± SD rate, 0.8 ± 0.5 mL/kg/h [0.36 ± 0.23 mL/lb/h]) of Hb-200 was administered to 37 cats (after bolus infusion in 36). Mean SAP during the CRI was 92 ± 18 mm Hg. Adverse effects included respiratory changes (n = 8 cats), vomiting (2), and pigmented serum (30). Seventeen (39%) cats survived to discharge from the hospital, 6 died, and 21 were euthanized.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hb-200 effectively increased SAP in hypotensive cats with few adverse effects.

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Scott Jackson and Kwang Woo Ahn for assistance with statistical analysis.

Address correspondence to Dr. Wehausen (weha0001@umn.edu).