• 1.

    Blackshaw JKSutton RHBoyhan MA. Tail chasing or circling behavior in dogs. Canine Pract 1994; 19 (3): 711.

  • 2.

    Moon-Fanelli AADodman NH. Description and development of compulsive tail chasing in terriers and response to clomipramine treatment. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 212: 12521257.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Brown SACrowell-Davis SMalcolm T, et al. Naloxone-responsive compulsive tail chasing in a dog. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1987; 190: 884886.

  • 4.

    Dodman NHKnowles KEShuster L, et al. Behavioral changes associated with suspected complex partial seizures in Bull Terriers. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996; 208: 688691.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Dodman NHBronson RGliatto J. Tail chasing in a Bull Terrier. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1993; 202: 758760.

  • 6.

    Uchida YMoon-Fanelli AADodman NH, et al. Serum concentrations of zinc and copper in Bull Terriers with lethal acrodermatitis and tail-chasing behavior. Am J Vet Res 1997; 58: 808810.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Dodman NHMoon-Fanelli AAMertens PA. Veterinary models of OCD. In: Hollander E, Stein DJ, eds. Obsessive-compulsive disorders: diagnosis, etiology, treatment. New York: Marcel Dekker Inc, 1997; 99143.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Luescher A. Diagnosis and management of compulsive disorders in dogs and cats. Clin Tech Small Anim Pract 2004; 19: 233239.

  • 9.

    Overall KLDunham AE. Clinical features and outcome in dogs and cats with obsessive-compulsive disorder: 126 cases (1989–2000). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002; 221: 14451452.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Dodman NHSmith AHolmes D. Comparison of the efficacy of remote consultations and personal consultations for the treatment of dogs which are aggressive towards their owners. Vet Rec 2005; 156: 168170.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    McCullagh PNelder JA. Generalized linear models. 2nd ed. London: Chapman & Hall, 1989.

  • 12.

    Olsson U. Maximum likelihood estimation of the polychoric correlation coefficient. Psychometrika 1979; 44: 443460.

  • 13.

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 4th ed. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1995.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Bodfish JWSymons FJParker DE, et al. Varieties of repetitive behavior in autism: comparisons to mental retardation. J Autism Dev Disord 2000; 30: 237243.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15.

    Parikh MSKolevzon AHollander E. Psychopharmacology of aggression in children and adolescents with autism: a critical review of efficacy and tolerability. J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol 2008; 18: 157178.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    Stone JLMerriman BCantor RM, et al. Evidence for sex-specific risk alleles in autism spectrum disorder. Am J Hum Genet 2004; 75: 11171123.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17.

    Williams ECostall AReddy V. Children with autism experience problems with both objects and people. J Autism Dev Disord 1999; 29: 367378.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Kim JASzatmari PBryson SE et al. The prevalence of anxiety and mood problems among children with autism and Asperger syndrome. Autism 2000; 4: 117132.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    Dodman NHMiczek KAKnowles K, et al. Phenobarbital-responsive episodic dyscontrol (rage) in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1992; 201: 15801583.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    de Lahunta A. Nonolfactory rhinencephalon: limbic system. In: Veterinary neuroanatomy and clinical neurology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co, 1983;318.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21.

    Gabis LPomeroy JAndriola MR. Autism and epilepsy: cause, consequence, comorbidity or coincidence? Epilepsy Behav 2005; 7: 652656.

  • 22.

    Rossi PGParmeggiani ABach V, et al. EEG features and epilepsy in patients with autism. Brain Dev 1995; 17: 169174.

  • 23.

    Short ABSchopler E. Factors relating to age of onset in autism. J Autism Dev Disord 1988; 18: 207216.

  • 24.

    Chabane NDelorme RMillet B, et al. Early-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder: a subgroup with a specific clinical and familial pattern. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2005; 46: 881887.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25.

    Hewson CJLuescher UAParent JM, et al. Efficacy of clomipramine in the treatment of canine compulsive disorder. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 213: 17601766.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Characteristics of compulsive tail chasing and associated risk factors in Bull Terriers

View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Clinical Science, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Science, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536
  • | 3 Department of Animal Science, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Science, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate and define the characteristics of tail chasing in Bull Terriers and explore the association between tail chasing and other behavioral and physical characteristics.

Design—Survey and case-control study.

Animals—333 Bull Terriers (145 dogs with tail-chasing behavior and 188 unaffected dogs).

Procedures—Owners of Bull Terriers with tail-chasing behavior were surveyed regarding the age of onset, triggers, frequency, duration, interruptability, degree of disruption to the dogs' normal functioning and the owners' relationship with the dog, and associated medical and physical consequences. Associations of tail chasing with various behavioral and physical characteristics were examined by comparison of dogs with tail-chasing behavior with unaffected dogs.

Results—Phenotypic and developmental descriptions of tail chasing in Bull Terriers were defined. Associations of tail chasing with sex, trance-like behavior, and episodic aggression were found. Males were at an 8% greater risk for the diagnosis of tail chasing than females. Phobias and owner-directed aggression did not significantly associate with tail chasing in the final log-linear model, but did have significant associations in earlier analyses that did not include the behaviors of episodic aggression and trance-like behavior.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In Bull Terriers with tail-chasing behavior, there was a slight increase in the susceptibility of males to develop tail-chasing behavior, compared with females. A close association of tail chasing with trance-like behavior and episodic aggression was identified.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Moon-Fanelli's present address is Animal Behavior Consultations LLC, Brooklyn Veterinary Hospital, PO Box 285, Brooklyn, CT 06234.