• 1.

    Cook C, Davidson M, Brinkmann M, et al. Diode laser transscleral cyclophotocoagulation for the treatment of glaucoma in dogs: results of six and twelve month follow-up. Vet Comp Ophthalmol 1997; 7:148154.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Hardman C, Stanley RG. Diode laser transscleral cyclophotocoagulation for the treatment of primary glaucoma in 18 dogs: a retrospective study. Vet Ophthalmol 2001; 4:209215.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Bentley E, Nasisse MP, Glover T, et al. Implantation of filtering devices in dogs with glaucoma: preliminary results in 13 eyes. Vet Comp Ophthalmol 1996; 6:243246.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Gelatt KN, Brooks DE, Miller TR, et al. Issues in ophthalmic therapy: the development of anterior chamber shunts for the clinical management of the canine glaucomas. Prog Vet Comp Ophthalmol 1992; 2:5964.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Tinsley DM, Betts DM. Clinical experience with a glaucoma drainage device in dogs. Vet Comp Ophthalmol 1994; 4:7784.

  • 6.

    Shah AA, WuDunn D, Cantor LB. Shunt revision versus additional tube shunt implantation after failed tube shunt surgery in refractory glaucoma. Am J Ophthalmol 2000;129:455460.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Glover TL, Nasisse MP, Davidson MG. Effects of topically applied mitomycin-C on intraocular pressure, facility of outflow, and fibrosis after glaucoma filtration surgery in clinically normal dogs. Am J Vet Res 1995;56:936940.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Tinsley DM, Niyo Y, Tinsley LM, et al. In vivo clinical trial of perioperative mitomycin-C in combination with a drainage device implantation in normal canine globes. Vet Comp Ophthalmol 1995; 5:231241.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Adam CR, Gregory LS. Clinical perspectives on glaucoma-filtering surgery: antiproliferative agents. Ophthalmol Clin North Am 2000; 13:501515.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Garcia-Sanchez GA, Brooks DE, Gelatt KN, et al. Evaluation of valved and nonvalved gonioimplants in 83 eyes of 65 dogs with glaucoma. Anim Eye Res 1998; 17:916.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Bedford PGC. A clinical evaluation of a one-piece drainage system in the treatment of canine glaucoma. J Small Anim Pract 1989; 30:6875.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Bentley E, Miller PE, Murphy CJ, et al. Combined cycloablation and gonioimplantation for treatment of glaucoma in dogs: 18 cases (1992–1998). J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999; 215:14691472.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Sapienza JS, van der Woerdt A. Combined transscleral diode laser cyclophotocoagulation and Ahmed gonioimplantation in dogs with primary glaucoma: 51 cases (1996–2004). Vet Ophthalmol 2005; 8:121127.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Molteno AC, Fucik M, Dempster AG, et al. Otago glaucoma surgery outcome study: factors controlling capsule fibrosis around Molteno implants with histopathological correlation. Ophthalmology 2003; 110:21982206.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15.

    Cullen CL. Cullen frontal sinus valved glaucoma shunt: preliminary findings in dogs with primary glaucoma. Vet Ophthalmol 2004; 7:311318.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    Håkanson NW. Extraorbital diversion of aqueous in the treatment of glaucoma in the dog: a pilot study including two recipient sites. Vet Comp Ophthalmol 1996; 6:8290.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17.

    Lima FE, Magacho L, Carvalho DM, et al. A prospective, comparative study between endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation and the Ahmed drainage implant in refractory glaucoma. J Glaucoma 2004; 13:233237.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Lin SC. Endoscopic and transscleral cyclophotocoagulation for the treatment of refractory glaucoma. J Glaucoma 2008; 17:238247.

  • 19.

    Holt JE, Holt GR, van Kirk M. Use of temporalis fascia in eyelid reconstruction. Ophthalmology 1984; 91:8993.

  • 20.

    Jordan DR, Klapper SR. Wrapping hydroxyapatite implants. Ophthalmic Surg Lasers 1999; 30:403407.

  • 21.

    Sagoo MS, Olver JM. Autogenous temporalis fascia patch graft for porous polyethylene (Medpor) sphere orbital implant exposure. Br J Ophthalmol 2004; 88:942946.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22.

    Thomas DA, Khalifa YM. Temporalis fascia in the management of gold eyelid weight extrusion. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2005; 21:153155.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23.

    Wiggs EO, Becker BB. Extrusion of enucleation implants: treatment with secondary implants and autogenous temporalis fascia or fascia lata patch grafts. Ophthalmic Surg 1992; 23:472476.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 24.

    Dougherty PJ, Hardten DR, Lindstrom RL. Corneoscleral melt after pterygium surgery using a single intraoperative application of mitomycin-C. Cornea 1996; 15:537540.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25.

    Wan Norliza WM, Raihan IS, Azwa JA, et al. Scleral melting 16 years after pterygium excision with topical mitomycin C adjuvant therapy. Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2006; 29:165167.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26.

    Oguz H, Basar E, Gurler B. Intraoperative application versus postoperative mitomycin C eye drops in pterygium surgery. Acta Ophthalmol Scand 1999; 77:147150.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 27.

    Kurnaz E, Kubaloglu A, Yilmaz Y, et al. The effect of adjunctive mitomycin C in Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. Eur J Ophthalmol 2005; 15:2731.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 28.

    Costa VP, Azuara-Blanco A, Netland PA, et al. Efficacy and safety of adjunctive mitomycin C during Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation: a prospective randomized clinical trial. Ophthalmology 2004; 111:10711076.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 29.

    Valimaki J, Tuulonen A, Airaksinen PJ. Capsule excision after failed Molteno surgery. Ophthalmic Surg Lasers 1997; 28:382386.

  • 30.

    Palmberg P. The failing filtering bleb. Ophthalmol Clin North Am 2000; 13:517529.

  • 31.

    Garcia-Sanchez GA, Whitley RD, Brooks DE, et al. Ahmed valve implantation to control intractable glaucoma after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in a dog. Vet Ophthalmol 2005; 8:139144.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 32.

    Costa VP, Arcieri ES. Hypotony maculopathy. Acta Ophthalmol Scand 2007; 85:586597.

  • 33.

    Stefánsson E. Ocular hypotony: what is the mechanism of effusion and oedema? Acta Ophthalmol Scand 2007; 85:584585.

Advertisement

Long-term evaluation of the use of Ahmed gonioimplants in dogs with primary glaucoma: nine cases (2000–2008)

Hans D. WestermeyerDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Search for other papers by Hans D. Westermeyer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Diane V. H. HendrixDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Search for other papers by Diane V. H. Hendrix in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, DACVO
, and
Daniel A. WardDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Search for other papers by Daniel A. Ward in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD, DACVO

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the outcome and describe the complications associated with use of an Ahmed gonioimplant in the treatment of glaucoma in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—9 client-owned sighted dogs (median age, 9 years) with primary glaucoma.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with primary glaucoma that underwent unilateral gonioimplant placement (in 2000 through 2008), during which a temporalis muscle fascia graft (n = 8) or porcine intestinal submucosa (1) was used to cover the implant tube as it exited the globe, were reviewed. All dogs were treated with mitomycin C in the conjunctival pocket intraoperatively and with tissue plasminogen activator immediately after surgery; 1% prednisolone acetate was applied to the implanted eye daily until failure of the implant. Medical intervention or additional surgery was performed when intraocular pressures (IOPs) were > 20 mm Hg or progressively increasing values were detected.

Results—After gonioimplant placement, IOP was controlled for a variable period in all dogs. Subsequently, IOP exceeded 20 mm Hg in 7 dogs (median postoperative interval, 326 days). Median interval to vision loss despite interventional surgery was 518 days (range, 152 to 1,220 days). Surgical intervention was necessary in 4 dogs to maintain satisfactory IOP. Implant extrusion attributable to conjunctival dehiscence or necrosis occurred in 4 dogs. At 365 days after surgery, 8 dogs retained vision, and 5 dogs retained vision throughout follow-up.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs with medically refractory primary glaucoma, placement of a gonioimplant appears to be effective in maintaining vision.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the outcome and describe the complications associated with use of an Ahmed gonioimplant in the treatment of glaucoma in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—9 client-owned sighted dogs (median age, 9 years) with primary glaucoma.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with primary glaucoma that underwent unilateral gonioimplant placement (in 2000 through 2008), during which a temporalis muscle fascia graft (n = 8) or porcine intestinal submucosa (1) was used to cover the implant tube as it exited the globe, were reviewed. All dogs were treated with mitomycin C in the conjunctival pocket intraoperatively and with tissue plasminogen activator immediately after surgery; 1% prednisolone acetate was applied to the implanted eye daily until failure of the implant. Medical intervention or additional surgery was performed when intraocular pressures (IOPs) were > 20 mm Hg or progressively increasing values were detected.

Results—After gonioimplant placement, IOP was controlled for a variable period in all dogs. Subsequently, IOP exceeded 20 mm Hg in 7 dogs (median postoperative interval, 326 days). Median interval to vision loss despite interventional surgery was 518 days (range, 152 to 1,220 days). Surgical intervention was necessary in 4 dogs to maintain satisfactory IOP. Implant extrusion attributable to conjunctival dehiscence or necrosis occurred in 4 dogs. At 365 days after surgery, 8 dogs retained vision, and 5 dogs retained vision throughout follow-up.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs with medically refractory primary glaucoma, placement of a gonioimplant appears to be effective in maintaining vision.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Westermeyer's present address is Peace Avenue Veterinary Clinic, 7B Liberty Ave, MongKok, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China.

Presented in abstract form at the 40th Annual American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists Conference, Chicago, November 2009.

Address correspondence to Dr. Hendrix (dhendrix@utk.edu).