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Clinicopathologic characterization of odontogenic tumors and focal fibrous hyperplasia in dogs: 152 cases (1995–2005)

Nadine Fiani BVSc1, Frank J. M. Verstraete DrMedVet, MMedVet, DAVDC2, Philip H. Kass DVM, MPVM, PhD, DACVPM3, and Darren P. Cox DDS, MBA4
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  • 1 William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 4 Department of Orofacial Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94122.

Abstract

Objective—To characterize clinicopathologic features of the most common odontogenic tumors and focal fibrous hyperplasia (FFH) in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—152 dogs evaluated for oral tumors of possible odontogenic origin at the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital of the University of California-Davis between 1995 and 2005.

Procedures—Information was collected from records, including dog breed, age, reproductive status, and location of lesion in the oral cavity. Histologic slides pertaining to each dog were reviewed by 3 investigators. Data regarding clinicopathologic features of the 3 most common lesions (canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma [CAA], peripheral odontogenic fibroma [POF], and FFH) were summarized.

Results—152 dogs with odontogenic tumors or FFH were identified. Sixty-eight (45%) dogs had CAA, 47 (31 %) had POF, 24 (16%) had FFH, and 13 (9%) had other odontogenic tumors. Canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma was present most commonly in the rostral aspect of the mandible, with POF and FFH more common in the rostral aspect of the maxilla. Males and females were equally represented among dogs with CAA and FFH. Castrated males were overrepresented among dogs with POF. Golden Retrievers, Akitas, Cocker Spaniels, and Shetland Sheepdogs were overrepresented among dogs with CAA. No breed predisposition was detected for FFH or POF. Dogs with FFH had a greater mean age at initial evaluation than did dogs with CAA or POF.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—CAA, POF, and FFH have distinct clinical patterns that may help clinicians and pathologists identify such lesions more readily.

Abstract

Objective—To characterize clinicopathologic features of the most common odontogenic tumors and focal fibrous hyperplasia (FFH) in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—152 dogs evaluated for oral tumors of possible odontogenic origin at the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital of the University of California-Davis between 1995 and 2005.

Procedures—Information was collected from records, including dog breed, age, reproductive status, and location of lesion in the oral cavity. Histologic slides pertaining to each dog were reviewed by 3 investigators. Data regarding clinicopathologic features of the 3 most common lesions (canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma [CAA], peripheral odontogenic fibroma [POF], and FFH) were summarized.

Results—152 dogs with odontogenic tumors or FFH were identified. Sixty-eight (45%) dogs had CAA, 47 (31 %) had POF, 24 (16%) had FFH, and 13 (9%) had other odontogenic tumors. Canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma was present most commonly in the rostral aspect of the mandible, with POF and FFH more common in the rostral aspect of the maxilla. Males and females were equally represented among dogs with CAA and FFH. Castrated males were overrepresented among dogs with POF. Golden Retrievers, Akitas, Cocker Spaniels, and Shetland Sheepdogs were overrepresented among dogs with CAA. No breed predisposition was detected for FFH or POF. Dogs with FFH had a greater mean age at initial evaluation than did dogs with CAA or POF.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—CAA, POF, and FFH have distinct clinical patterns that may help clinicians and pathologists identify such lesions more readily.

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Dr. Jaromir Benak for assistance in interpreting the histologic slides, John Doval for the medical illustrations, and Jeffrey Smith for assistance with data collection.

Address correspondence to Dr. Verstraete (fjverstraete@ucdavis.edu).