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Assessment of avian influenza surveillance and reporting needs of stakeholders in Michigan, 2007

Nicole K. Martell-Moran DVM, MPH1, Whitney A. Mauer DVM, PhD2, and John B. Kaneene DVM, MPH, PhD3
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  • 1 Center for Comparative Epidemiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 2 Center for Comparative Epidemiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 3 Center for Comparative Epidemiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

Abstract

Objective—To identify stakeholders who should be included in a Michigan-based avian influenza surveillance system (AISS) and to describe their avian influenza (AI) surveillance and reporting needs.

Design—Cross-sectional survey involving a convenience sample of respondents.

Sample—272 federal, state, and local governmental and regulatory agency professionals; veterinarians and laboratory professionals in academia; private practice veterinarians; and poultry industry members.

Procedures—A needs assessment survey that focused on stakeholder identification, current surveillance methods, information sharing, and desired AISS enhancements was administered by mail, and responses were summarized.

Results—Various AISS stakeholders were identified, among whom the requirements for surveillance information and methods of reporting (including via a World Wide Web-based database, e-mail, and a website) differed. Although 90% of all respondent types indicated that poultry industry representatives were key stakeholders, < 33% of poultry industry respondents indicated that private practice veterinarians and personnel in laboratories or public agencies should be considered stakeholders. The predominant concern (55.4% of respondents) regarding the current AISS was the effectiveness of communication among agencies, industry, and the public. The primary challenge identified by respondents was confidentiality (30.2% of respondents).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In Michigan—and potentially in other regions of the United States—integration of Internet-related data systems and stakeholder communication is likely to promote earlier identification of AI, achieve more effective responses to outbreaks, reduce morbidity among humans and other animals, and decrease outbreak-associated financial losses. Stakeholder education and technological safeguard assurances will be essential in AISS enhancement.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Martell-Morans' present address is Chesterfield Animal Hospital, 83 Skyview Dr, Chesterfield, IN 46017.

Supported by the Michigan Department of Community Health.

Address correspondence to Dr. Kaneene (kaneene@cvm.msu.edu).