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Pathology in Practice

Elizabeth J. O'Neil MBA, DVM1, Barbara S. Horney DVM, PhD, DACVP2, Rachelle L. Gagnon DVM3, and Shelley A. Burton DVM, MSc, DACVP4
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  • 1 Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3, Canada.
  • | 2 Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3, Canada.
  • | 3 Hôpital Vétérinaire de Shédiac Veterinary Hospital Incorporated, 301A Main St, Shediac, NB E4P 2A9, Canada.
  • | 4 Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3, Canada.
History

A 7-year-old 4.7-kg (10.3-lb) neutered male domestic longhair cat was examined because of a swelling of the right forepaw. The right metacarpal area was swollen (widest diameter, 1.5 cm), and a draining tract was visible on the cranial aspect.

Clinical and Gross Findings

Palpation of the limb did not elicit signs of pain, and no other abnormalities were noted during physical examination. Results of a CBC and serum biochemical analyses were within reference limits. A testa for circulating FeLV antigen and anti-FIV antibodies yielded negative results.

Hair on the lower portion of the right limb was clipped,

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. O'Neil (eoneil@upei.ca).