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Recognition of the threat of Ehrlichia ruminantium infection in domestic and wild ruminants in the continental United States

Thomas R. Kasari DVM, MVSc, DACVIM, DACVPM1, Ryan S. Miller MSc2, Angela M. James PhD3, and Jerome E. Freier DVM, PhD4
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  • 1 National Surveillance Unit, Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Health, Veterinary Services, APHIS, USDA, 2150 Centre Ave, Building B, Fort Collins, CO 80526
  • | 2 Center for Animal Health Information and Analysis, Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Health, Veterinary Services, APHIS, USDA, 2150 Centre Ave, Building B, Fort Collins, CO 80526
  • | 3 Center for Animal Health Information and Analysis, Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Health, Veterinary Services, APHIS, USDA, 2150 Centre Ave, Building B, Fort Collins, CO 80526
  • | 4 Center for Animal Health Information and Analysis, Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Health, Veterinary Services, APHIS, USDA, 2150 Centre Ave, Building B, Fort Collins, CO 80526

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Kasari (tom.r.kasari@aphis.usda.gov).