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Assessment of oxygen transport and utilization in dogs with naturally occurring sepsis

Amy L. Butler dvm, ms, dacvecc1 and Vicki L. Campbell dvm, dacva, dacvecc2
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Abstract

Objective—To compare cardiac index (CI), oxygen delivery index (o2I), oxygen extraction ratio (O2ER), oxygen consumption index (o2I), and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) in dogs with naturally occurring sepsis with published values for healthy dogs; compare those variables in dogs with sepsis that did or did not survive; and compare CI and o2I in dogs with sepsis with values in dogs with nonseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome (nSIRS).

Design—Cohort study.

Animals—10 dogs with naturally occurring sepsis and 11 dogs with nSIRS.

Procedures—Over 24 hours, CI, o2I, O2ER, o2I, and SVRI were measured 4 and 5 times in dogs with sepsis and with nSIRS, respectively. The mean values of each variable in each group were compared over time and between groups; data for dogs with sepsis that did or did not survive were also compared.

Results—Mean o2I was significantly decreased, and mean CI, O2ER, o2I, and SVRI were not significantly different in dogs with sepsis, compared with published values for healthy dogs. Mean CI and o2I in dogs with sepsis were significantly greater than values in dogs with nSIRS. Among dogs with sepsis that did or did not survive, values of CI, o2I, O2ER, o2I, and SVRI did not differ significantly.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Compared with values in healthy dogs, only o2 was significantly lower in dogs with sepsis. Values of CI and o2I were significantly higher in dogs with sepsis than in dogs with nSIRS, suggesting differing degrees of myocardial dysfunction between these groups.

Abstract

Objective—To compare cardiac index (CI), oxygen delivery index (o2I), oxygen extraction ratio (O2ER), oxygen consumption index (o2I), and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) in dogs with naturally occurring sepsis with published values for healthy dogs; compare those variables in dogs with sepsis that did or did not survive; and compare CI and o2I in dogs with sepsis with values in dogs with nonseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome (nSIRS).

Design—Cohort study.

Animals—10 dogs with naturally occurring sepsis and 11 dogs with nSIRS.

Procedures—Over 24 hours, CI, o2I, O2ER, o2I, and SVRI were measured 4 and 5 times in dogs with sepsis and with nSIRS, respectively. The mean values of each variable in each group were compared over time and between groups; data for dogs with sepsis that did or did not survive were also compared.

Results—Mean o2I was significantly decreased, and mean CI, O2ER, o2I, and SVRI were not significantly different in dogs with sepsis, compared with published values for healthy dogs. Mean CI and o2I in dogs with sepsis were significantly greater than values in dogs with nSIRS. Among dogs with sepsis that did or did not survive, values of CI, o2I, O2ER, o2I, and SVRI did not differ significantly.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Compared with values in healthy dogs, only o2 was significantly lower in dogs with sepsis. Values of CI and o2I were significantly higher in dogs with sepsis than in dogs with nSIRS, suggesting differing degrees of myocardial dysfunction between these groups.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Butler's present address is the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

Supported by a grant from the Colorado State University College Research Council.

Address correspondence to Dr. Butler (amy.butler@cvm.osu.edu).