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Laparoscopy for percutaneous tube cystostomy in dogs

Jian-Tao Zhang DVM, PhD1, Hong-Bin Wang DVM, PhD2, Jiao Shi MVSc, MS3, Nan Zhang MVSc, MS4, Shi-Xia Zhang MVSc, MS5, and Hong-Gang Fan DVM, PhD6
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030, PR China.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030, PR China.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030, PR China.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030, PR China.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030, PR China.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030, PR China.

Abstract

Objective—To describe a laparoscopic technique for percutaneous tube cystostomy in dogs.

Design—Prospective cohort study.

Animals—8 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—A laparoscope portal and 2 instrumental portals were created in the abdomen of anesthetized dogs that were in dorsal recumbency. Intracorporeal suturing was performed to place 2 simple interrupted sutures between the ventral body wall and urinary bladder. A purse-string suture was placed in the urinary bladder wall approximately 1 cm cranial to the 2 simple interrupted sutures. A stab incision was made into the urinary bladder in the middle of the purse-string suture; an 8F Foley catheter was inserted through the stab incision and into the urinary bladder. Two other sutures were placed between the ventral body wall and bladder 1 cm cranial to the Foley catheter to create a cystopexy. The Foley catheter was secured to the skin with a finger-trap suture and was attached to a closed urine collection bag. All dogs underwent follow-up laparoscopy 1 month later.

Results—Median time for laparoscopic percutaneous tube cystostomy was 85 minutes (range, 72 to 103 minutes); there were no major intraoperative or postoperative complications. On follow-up laparoscopy, focal fibrous adhesions between the ventral body wall and bladder were observed in all dogs and omentum attached to the cystopexy site was observed in 2 dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In this study, a laparoscopic percutaneous tube cystostomy was accomplished in healthy dogs by use of a 3-portal technique and appeared to be an effective and safe procedure.

Abstract

Objective—To describe a laparoscopic technique for percutaneous tube cystostomy in dogs.

Design—Prospective cohort study.

Animals—8 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—A laparoscope portal and 2 instrumental portals were created in the abdomen of anesthetized dogs that were in dorsal recumbency. Intracorporeal suturing was performed to place 2 simple interrupted sutures between the ventral body wall and urinary bladder. A purse-string suture was placed in the urinary bladder wall approximately 1 cm cranial to the 2 simple interrupted sutures. A stab incision was made into the urinary bladder in the middle of the purse-string suture; an 8F Foley catheter was inserted through the stab incision and into the urinary bladder. Two other sutures were placed between the ventral body wall and bladder 1 cm cranial to the Foley catheter to create a cystopexy. The Foley catheter was secured to the skin with a finger-trap suture and was attached to a closed urine collection bag. All dogs underwent follow-up laparoscopy 1 month later.

Results—Median time for laparoscopic percutaneous tube cystostomy was 85 minutes (range, 72 to 103 minutes); there were no major intraoperative or postoperative complications. On follow-up laparoscopy, focal fibrous adhesions between the ventral body wall and bladder were observed in all dogs and omentum attached to the cystopexy site was observed in 2 dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In this study, a laparoscopic percutaneous tube cystostomy was accomplished in healthy dogs by use of a 3-portal technique and appeared to be an effective and safe procedure.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Wang (neau1940@yahoo.com.cn).