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Successful treatment of a Vietnamese potbellied pig with an ovarian leiomyoma

Chad A. BaumwartDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

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Tulio M. PradoDepartment of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

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Megan P. AndersonDepartment of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

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Elizabeth A. CoffmanDepartment of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

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Katie M. SimpsonDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

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Gregory A. CampbellDepartment of Veterinary Pathobiology, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

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Abstract

Case Description—An adult sexually intact female Vietnamese potbellied pig was examined because of abdominal distention of 5 months' duration.

Clinical Findings—The pig was moderately anemic, and its abdomen was greatly distended. A freely movable abdominal mass was detected during palpation and ultrasonographic examination of the abdomen. Examination of abdominal and thoracic radiographs revealed faint, ill-defined, linear and curvilinear mineralized opacities in the region of the mass and that the gastrointestinal tract was displaced craniodorsally. Results of radiographic exami-nation suggested that the cause of distention was a single abdominal mass (possibly a neoplasm).

Treatment and Outcome—Surgery was performed, and the mass, which was identified as the right ovary, was removed. The left ovary had a normal appearance, but it was also removed during surgery. The pig was administered a transfusion (314 mL of plasma and 296 mL of packed RBCs) before and during surgery. The mass, which accounted for ap-proximately one-third of the pig's body weight, was identified histologically as an ovarian leiomyoma.

Clinical Relevance—Pigs can safely be administered a transfusion of RBCs and plasma. Ovarian tumors can be removed from Vietnamese potbellied pigs, which allows them to be used as pets or for reproduction when only 1 ovary is affected. Uterine masses in older sexually intact Vietnamese potbellied pigs are more common than are ovarian tumors; thus, complete ovariohysterectomy should be considered when the primary purpose of the pig is to serve as a pet.

Abstract

Case Description—An adult sexually intact female Vietnamese potbellied pig was examined because of abdominal distention of 5 months' duration.

Clinical Findings—The pig was moderately anemic, and its abdomen was greatly distended. A freely movable abdominal mass was detected during palpation and ultrasonographic examination of the abdomen. Examination of abdominal and thoracic radiographs revealed faint, ill-defined, linear and curvilinear mineralized opacities in the region of the mass and that the gastrointestinal tract was displaced craniodorsally. Results of radiographic exami-nation suggested that the cause of distention was a single abdominal mass (possibly a neoplasm).

Treatment and Outcome—Surgery was performed, and the mass, which was identified as the right ovary, was removed. The left ovary had a normal appearance, but it was also removed during surgery. The pig was administered a transfusion (314 mL of plasma and 296 mL of packed RBCs) before and during surgery. The mass, which accounted for ap-proximately one-third of the pig's body weight, was identified histologically as an ovarian leiomyoma.

Clinical Relevance—Pigs can safely be administered a transfusion of RBCs and plasma. Ovarian tumors can be removed from Vietnamese potbellied pigs, which allows them to be used as pets or for reproduction when only 1 ovary is affected. Uterine masses in older sexually intact Vietnamese potbellied pigs are more common than are ovarian tumors; thus, complete ovariohysterectomy should be considered when the primary purpose of the pig is to serve as a pet.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Baumwart's present address is Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Address correspondence to Dr. Baumwart (cbaumwart@utk.edu).