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Effects of glucosamine–chondroitin sulfate supplementation on serum fructosamine concentration in healthy dogs

Catherine E. LenoxDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Katharine F. LunnDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 BVMS, PhD, DACVIM

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether short-term administration of an oral glucosamine–chondroitin sulfate (Glu-CS) supplement alters serum fructosamine concentration in healthy dogs.

Design—Prospective crossover study.

Animals—12 healthy adult dogs.

Procedures—Dogs received Glu-CS and a placebo for 3 weeks each, with a 4-week minimum washout period between treatments. Serum fructosamine concentration was measured 4 times for each dog: prior to the first treatment period, at the end of the first treatment period, at the end of the washout period, and at the end of the second treatment period.

Results—No significant change in serum fructosamine concentration was identified after treatment with either Glu-CS or the placebo. The change in serum fructosamine concentration associated with Glu-CS administration was not significantly different from the change in concentration associated with administration of the placebo.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that in healthy dogs, short-term (ie, 21 days) oral Glu-CS administration does not affect glycemic control or cause diabetes mellitus.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether short-term administration of an oral glucosamine–chondroitin sulfate (Glu-CS) supplement alters serum fructosamine concentration in healthy dogs.

Design—Prospective crossover study.

Animals—12 healthy adult dogs.

Procedures—Dogs received Glu-CS and a placebo for 3 weeks each, with a 4-week minimum washout period between treatments. Serum fructosamine concentration was measured 4 times for each dog: prior to the first treatment period, at the end of the first treatment period, at the end of the washout period, and at the end of the second treatment period.

Results—No significant change in serum fructosamine concentration was identified after treatment with either Glu-CS or the placebo. The change in serum fructosamine concentration associated with Glu-CS administration was not significantly different from the change in concentration associated with administration of the placebo.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that in healthy dogs, short-term (ie, 21 days) oral Glu-CS administration does not affect glycemic control or cause diabetes mellitus.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Lenox's present address is Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061. Nutramax Laboratories Inc. prepared the glucosamine–chondroitin sulfate and placebo treatments used in the study.

Address correspondence to Dr. Lunn (kathy.lunn@colostate.edu).