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Diversion of the urine stream by surgical modification of the preputial ostium in a dog

Michael M. Pavletic DVM, DACVS1 and Douglas E. Brum DVM2
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  • 1 Department of Surgery, Angell Animal Medical Center, 350 S Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02130.
  • | 2 Department of Medicine, Angell Animal Medical Center, 350 S Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02130.

Abstract

Case Description—A 1.4-year-old sexually intact male Standard Poodle was evaluated with a history of urinating on its left forelimb and lower portion of the thorax.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination revealed that the dog had an unusually elevated (tucked) abdominal wall and prominent dome-shaped thoracic wall. These anatomic changes altered the angle of the urine stream, resulting in the dog's soiling the xiphoid region of the thorax and left forelimb.

Treatment and Outcome—The dorsal half of the preputial ostium was closed surgically to divert the urine stream in a ventral direction. The ventral portion of the ostium was reciprocally enlarged. Postoperatively, the dog urinated in a downward direction, eliminating urine contact with the body.

Clinical Relevance—The preputial orifice (ostium) plays an important role in the shape and direction of the urine stream exiting the penile urethra. Dogs with an elevated abdominal wall and prominent dome-shaped thorax may be prone to contamination of the lower portion of the thorax and forelimbs with urine during normal micturition. Partial closure of the dorsal preputial ostium, with reciprocal enlargement of the lower half of the orifice, can create a deflective barrier that effectively diverts the urine stream in a ventral direction.

Abstract

Case Description—A 1.4-year-old sexually intact male Standard Poodle was evaluated with a history of urinating on its left forelimb and lower portion of the thorax.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination revealed that the dog had an unusually elevated (tucked) abdominal wall and prominent dome-shaped thoracic wall. These anatomic changes altered the angle of the urine stream, resulting in the dog's soiling the xiphoid region of the thorax and left forelimb.

Treatment and Outcome—The dorsal half of the preputial ostium was closed surgically to divert the urine stream in a ventral direction. The ventral portion of the ostium was reciprocally enlarged. Postoperatively, the dog urinated in a downward direction, eliminating urine contact with the body.

Clinical Relevance—The preputial orifice (ostium) plays an important role in the shape and direction of the urine stream exiting the penile urethra. Dogs with an elevated abdominal wall and prominent dome-shaped thorax may be prone to contamination of the lower portion of the thorax and forelimbs with urine during normal micturition. Partial closure of the dorsal preputial ostium, with reciprocal enlargement of the lower half of the orifice, can create a deflective barrier that effectively diverts the urine stream in a ventral direction.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Pavletic (mpavletic@angell.org).