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Prognostic factors for dogs with mammary inflammatory carcinoma: 43 cases (2003–2008)

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  • 1 Clinica Veterinaria L'Arca, Vico Cacciottoli 46, 80129 Naples, Italy.
  • | 2 Clinica Veterinaria Nerviano, via Lampugnani 3, 20014 Nerviano, Milan, Italy.
  • | 3 Section of Veterinary Surgery, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy.
  • | 4 Clinica Veterinaria Sant'Antonio, via Montale 2, 25087 Salò, Brescia, Italy.
  • | 5 Clinica Veterinaria Gran Sasso, via Donatello 26, 20131 Milan, Italy.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Public Health and Animal Pathology, University of Bologna, 40064 Ozzano Emilia, Italy.
  • | 7 Clinica Veterinaria L'Arca, Vico Cacciottoli 46, 80129 Naples, Italy.
  • | 8 Clinica Veterinaria L'Arca, Vico Cacciottoli 46, 80129 Naples, Italy.
  • | 9 Clinica Veterinaria L'Arca, Vico Cacciottoli 46, 80129 Naples, Italy.
  • | 10 Clinica Veterinaria L'Arca, Vico Cacciottoli 46, 80129 Naples, Italy.
  • | 11 Clinic for Small Animal Internal Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zürich, 8057 Zürich, Switzerland.

Abstract

Objective—To describe clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcome of dogs with inflammatory carcinoma (IC) and identify patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors associated with overall survival time.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—43 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Records of dogs with a clinical diagnosis of IC that had histologic evidence of dermal lymphatic invasion were reviewed. Data on clinical staging, treatment, toxicoses, response, and survival time were retrieved.

Results—26 (60%) dogs had primary IC and 17 (40%) had secondary IC. Thirty-five (81%) dogs had distant metastases and 2 (5%) had local metastases at the time of initial examination. Six of 29 (21%) dogs had a coagulopathy. Sixteen (37%) dogs did not receive specific treatment for IC, 24 (56%) received medical treatment only, 2 (5%) underwent surgical excision and received medical treatment, and 1 (2%) underwent surgical excision only. Forty-one (95%) dogs had progressive disease, and 2 (5%) had stable disease. Mean survival time for all dogs was 60 days (range, 1 to 300 days). Dogs with a coagulopathy survived a significantly shorter time than did dogs without a coagulopathy (odds ratio, 0.28), and dogs that received medical treatment survived significantly longer than dogs that did not (odds ratio, 2.54).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that mammary IC is a biologically aggressive condition in dogs associated with a guarded prognosis. In addition, results suggested that medical treatment may improve outcome, thereby supporting its use in dogs with IC.

Abstract

Objective—To describe clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcome of dogs with inflammatory carcinoma (IC) and identify patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors associated with overall survival time.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—43 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Records of dogs with a clinical diagnosis of IC that had histologic evidence of dermal lymphatic invasion were reviewed. Data on clinical staging, treatment, toxicoses, response, and survival time were retrieved.

Results—26 (60%) dogs had primary IC and 17 (40%) had secondary IC. Thirty-five (81%) dogs had distant metastases and 2 (5%) had local metastases at the time of initial examination. Six of 29 (21%) dogs had a coagulopathy. Sixteen (37%) dogs did not receive specific treatment for IC, 24 (56%) received medical treatment only, 2 (5%) underwent surgical excision and received medical treatment, and 1 (2%) underwent surgical excision only. Forty-one (95%) dogs had progressive disease, and 2 (5%) had stable disease. Mean survival time for all dogs was 60 days (range, 1 to 300 days). Dogs with a coagulopathy survived a significantly shorter time than did dogs without a coagulopathy (odds ratio, 0.28), and dogs that received medical treatment survived significantly longer than dogs that did not (odds ratio, 2.54).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that mammary IC is a biologically aggressive condition in dogs associated with a guarded prognosis. In addition, results suggested that medical treatment may improve outcome, thereby supporting its use in dogs with IC.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Marconato's and Dr. Valenti's present address is Animal Oncology and Imaging Center, Rothusstrasse 2, 6331 Hünenberg/Zug, Switzerland.

Dr. Bonfanti's present address is Accelera-Nerviano Medical Sciences, viale Pasteur, 20014 Nerviano, Milan, Italy.

Presented in part at the ESVONC Annual Congress, Budapest, Hungary, March 2009.

Address correspondence to Dr. Marconato (lauramarconato@yahoo.it).