• 1.

    Vítovec J. Carcinomas of the intestine in cattle and pigs. Zentralbl Veterinarmed A 1977;24:413421.

  • 2.

    Misdorp W. Tumors in large domestic animals in the Netherlands. J Comp Pathol 1967;77:211216.

  • 3.

    Monlux AW, Anderson WA, Davis CL. A survey of tumors occurring in cattle, sheep, and swine. Am J Vet Res 1956;17:646677.

  • 4.

    Anderson LJ, Sandison AT. Tumors of the liver in cattle, sheep, and pigs. Cancer 1968;21:289301.

  • 5.

    Bundza A, Greig AS, Dukes TW. Primary hepatocellular carcinoma in animals killed at meat packing plants: report of 11 cases. Can Vet J 1984;25:8285.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Cotchin E. Tumors of farm animals: a survey of tumors examined at the Royal Veterinary College, London, during 1950–60. Vet Rec 1960;40:816822.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Fisher LF, Olander HJ. Spontaneous neoplasms of pigs—a study of 31 cases. J Comp Pathol 1978;88:505517.

  • 8.

    Munday JS, Stedman NL. Uterine leiomyomas in two Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs (Sus scrofa). Vet Pathol 2002;39:580583.

  • 9.

    Harmon BG, Munday JS, Crane MM. Diffuse cystic endometrial hyperplasia and metastatic endometrial adenocarcinoma in a Vietnamese pot-bellied pig (Sus scrofa). J Vet Diagn Invest 2004;16:587589.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Kleinschmidt S, Puff C, Baumgärtner W. Metastasizing oral squamous cell carcinoma in an aged pig. Vet Pathol 2006;43:569573.

  • 11.

    Morrow JL. Hepatocellular carcinoma and suspected splenic hemangiosarcoma in a potbellied pig. Can Vet J 2002;43:466468.

  • 12.

    Stalker MJ, Hayes MA. Liver and biliary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Pathology of domestic animals. 5th ed. Edinburgh: Elsevier Ltd, 2007;382388.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Cullen JM, Popp JA. Tumors of the liver and gall bladder. In: Meuten DJ, ed. Tumors in domestic animals. 4th ed. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press, 2002;483504.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Ramachandran KM, Rajan A, Mony G, et al. Hepatocellular carcinoma in a pig. Indian Vet J 1970;47:304306.

  • 15.

    Head KW, Else RW, Dubielzig RR. Tumors of the alimentary tract. In: Meuten DJ, ed. Tumors in domestic animals. 4th ed. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press, 2002;401478.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    Jones TC, Hunt RD, King NW. Diseases caused by bacteria. In: Jones TC, Hunt RD, King NW, eds. Veterinary pathology. 6th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1997;434.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17.

    Lingeman CH, Garner FM. Comparative study of intestinal adenocarcinomas of animals and man. J Natl Cancer Inst 1972;48:325346.

  • 18.

    Bassett JR, Mann FA, Constantinescu GM, et al. Subtotal colectomy and ileocolic anastomosis in a Vietnamese pot-bellied pig with idiopathic megacolon. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:16401643.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    Gallardo MA, Lawhorn DB, Taylor TS, et al. Spiral colon bypass in a geriatric Vietnamese potbellied pig. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:14081412.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    Rakestraw PC, Hardy J. Large intestine. In: Auer JA, Stick JA, eds. Equine surgery. 3rd ed. St Louis: Saunders Elsevier, 2006;462465.

Advertisement

Alimentary-associated carcinomas in five Vietnamese potbellied pigs

Annette M. McCoy DVM1, Eileen S. Hackett DVM, MS, DACVS, DACVECC2, Robert J. Callan DVM, PhD, DACVIM3, and Barbara E. Powers DVM, PhD, DACVP4
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 4 Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Abstract

Case Description—5 Vietnamese potbellied pigs were evaluated for abdominal distress that had not responded to medical treatment (4 pigs) or a draining tract of the cranial abdomen of unknown duration (1 pig).

Clinical Findings—Clinical signs in the pigs included anorexia, vomiting, and constipation. Physical examination revealed a palpable abdominal mass in all pigs. Radiography revealed distended loops of small intestine in 2 pigs.

Treatment and Outcome—3 pigs were treated successfully with wide-margin excision of the abdominal masses, and 2 were euthanized. Primary tumors were diagnosed at necropsy or through histologic evaluation of biopsy specimens obtained during surgery. Types of tumor included cholangiocellular carcinoma, transmural gastric carcinoma, small intestinal adenocarcinoma, metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma, and carcinoma. The tumors involved the stomach, small intestine, spiral colon, liver, and gall bladder. All 3 surgically treated pigs survived at least 9 months after surgery.

Clinical Relevance—Although rare, neoplasia of the alimentary system should be considered among the differential diagnoses for potbellied pigs with signs of abdominal distress. Wide-margin excision of the neoplastic tissue may result in a good outcome in affected pigs.

Abstract

Case Description—5 Vietnamese potbellied pigs were evaluated for abdominal distress that had not responded to medical treatment (4 pigs) or a draining tract of the cranial abdomen of unknown duration (1 pig).

Clinical Findings—Clinical signs in the pigs included anorexia, vomiting, and constipation. Physical examination revealed a palpable abdominal mass in all pigs. Radiography revealed distended loops of small intestine in 2 pigs.

Treatment and Outcome—3 pigs were treated successfully with wide-margin excision of the abdominal masses, and 2 were euthanized. Primary tumors were diagnosed at necropsy or through histologic evaluation of biopsy specimens obtained during surgery. Types of tumor included cholangiocellular carcinoma, transmural gastric carcinoma, small intestinal adenocarcinoma, metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma, and carcinoma. The tumors involved the stomach, small intestine, spiral colon, liver, and gall bladder. All 3 surgically treated pigs survived at least 9 months after surgery.

Clinical Relevance—Although rare, neoplasia of the alimentary system should be considered among the differential diagnoses for potbellied pigs with signs of abdominal distress. Wide-margin excision of the neoplastic tissue may result in a good outcome in affected pigs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. McCoy (mccoyann@colostate.edu).