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What Is The Evidence?

Bryan T. Torres DVM1, MaryAnn G. Radlinsky DVM, MS, DACVS2, and Steven C. Budsberg DVM, MS, DACVS3
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
Problem

A 4-year-old neutered male Ragdoll cat weighing 6.4 kg (14.0 lb) was evaluated at the University of Georgia Small Animal Teaching Hospital for ongoing pleural effusion diagnosed as chylothorax at the referring facility 4 months previously. At the time of the initial diagnosis, the cat was evaluated by an internist who confirmed the diagnosis. Appropriate medical management was susbsequently initiated, consisting of a low-fat diet, intermittent thoracocentesis, and rutin administration. When evaluated at the teaching hospital, the cat was receiving a diuretic (furosemide at an unknown dosage) prescribed for an earlier isolated instance of pulmonary edema following thoracocentesis, which

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Torres (btorres@uga.edu).