• 1.

    Cook VL, Jones Shults J, McDowell M, et al.Attenuation of ischaemic injury in the equine jejunum by administration of systemic lidocaine. Equine Vet J 2008;40:353357.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Malone E, Ensink J, Turner T, et al.Intravenous continuous infusion of lidocaine for treatment of equine ileus. Vet Surg 2006;35:6066.

  • 3.

    Meyer GA, Lin HC, Hanson RR, et al.Effects of intravenous lidocaine overdose on cardiac electrical activity and blood pressure in the horse. Equine Vet J 2001;33:434437.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Lieberman NA, Harris RS, Katz RI, et al.The effects of lidocaine on the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. Am J Cardiol 1968;22:375380.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Abutarbush SM. Use of ultrasonography to diagnose large colon volvulus in horses. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2006;228:409413.

  • 6.

    Pariaut R, Moïse NS, Koetje BD, et al.Evaluation of atrial fibrillation induced during anesthesia with fentanyl and pentobarbital in German Shepherd Dogs with inherited arrhythmias. Am J Vet Res 2008;69:14341445.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Sellon DC, Monroe VL, Roberts MC, et al.Pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of butorphanol administered by single intravenous injection or continuous intravenous infusion in horses. Am J Vet Res 2001;62:183189.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Garcia-Villar R, Toutain PL, Alvinerie M, et al.The pharmacokinetics of xylazine hydrochloride: an interspecific study. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 1981;4:8792.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

ECG of the Month

Kathleen R. Mullen MS1, Anna R. M. Gelzer DMV, DACVIM2, Marc S. Kraus DVM, DACVIM3, Katharyn Mitchell BVSc4, and Thomas J. Divers DVM, DACVIM, DACVECC5
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.
  • | 5 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

An 8-year-old 527-kg (1,159-lb) castrated male Appaloosa was evaluated by a referring veterinarian because of colic, of which the horse had a history of repeat episodes. During an episode of colic 6 months previously, the horse responded to treatment with flunixin meglumine. The referring veterinarian evaluated the horse at the farm; because the horse did not respond to treatment with flunixin at this time, it was transported to the veterinarian's clinic for further examination. During transrectal palpation, the referring veterinarian palpated a taut ventral cecal band. A sample of peritoneal fluid was collected via abdominal paracentesis; the protein content (0.4

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Kraus (msk16@cornell.edu).