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Diagnostic Imaging In Veterinary Dental Practice

Boaz Arzi DVM1 and Nadine Fiani BVSc2
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  • 1 Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service, William B. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service, William B. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
History and Physical Examination Findings

A 5-year-old 4.4-kg (9.7-lb) castrated male Himalayan cat was evaluated because of a mass involving the rostral portions of the mandibles. The cat had been adopted at an early age, and the medical history was unremarkable. The cat was reportedly otherwise healthy and showed no signs of pain or difficulties with prehension or mastication. The owner reported first noticing the mass 2 weeks earlier.

Results of a general physical examination were unremarkable. Extraoral examination revealed a 15 × 10 × 10-mm well-circumscribed, firm mass involving the rostral portion of the right mandible; signs of pain

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Arzi (barzi@ucdavis.edu).