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  • 1 Veterinary Specialists of South Florida, 9410 Stirling Rd, Cooper City, FL 33024.
History

A 4-year-old castrated male Labrador Retriever was evaluated because of vehicular trauma. The dog was ambulatory at the time of admission. A mild increase in respiratory effort and cyanosis were observed on physical examination. Heart and lung sounds were decreased on auscultation. Femoral pulses were moderate and synchronous. A small laceration was present at the right axilla. Thoracic radiographs were obtained (Figure 1).

Lateral (A) and ventrodorsal (B) radiographic views of the thorax of a 4-year-old castrated male Labrador Retriever that sustained vehicular trauma.

Determine whether additional imaging studies are required, or make your diagnosis

Contributor Notes

Dr. Orlando's present address is Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

Address correspondence to Dr. Orlando (jillvet21@yahoo.com).