Epidemiologic analysis of nosocomial Salmonella infections in hospitalized horses

Abel B. Ekiri Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by Abel B. Ekiri in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Robert J. MacKay Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by Robert J. MacKay in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD, DACVIM
,
Jack M. Gaskin Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by Jack M. Gaskin in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
David E. Freeman Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by David E. Freeman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD, DACVS
,
Amanda M. House Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by Amanda M. House in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, DACVIM
,
Steeve Giguère Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by Steeve Giguère in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD, DACVIM
,
Mats R. Troedsson Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by Mats R. Troedsson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD, DACT
,
Crystal D. Schuman Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by Crystal D. Schuman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS
,
Maria M. von Chamier Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by Maria M. von Chamier in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS
,
Katherine M. Henry Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by Katherine M. Henry in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BHS
, and
Jorge A. Hernandez Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by Jorge A. Hernandez in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MPVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objective—To examine the relationship between abdominal surgery and nosocomial Salmonella infections and the relationship between high caseload in combination with abdominal surgery and nosocomial Salmonella infections in hospitalized horses with signs of gastrointestinal tract disease.

Animals—140 horses.

Design—Case-control study.

Procedures—To accomplish the first objective, 1 to 4 control horses were matched with each nosocomial case horse on the basis of admission date of a primary case horse. The frequency of abdominal surgery and other investigated exposure factors were compared between nosocomial case horses and control horses. For the second objective, 4 control horses were matched with each nosocomial case horse on the basis of year of admission. The frequency of high caseload (≥ 26 inpatients), abdominal surgery, and other factors was compared between nosocomial case horses and control horses.

Results—The odds of nosocomial Salmonella infection were 8 times as high (odds ratio = 8.2; 95% confidence interval = 1.11, 60.24) in horses that underwent abdominal surgery, compared with the odds for horses that did not undergo surgery. High caseload alone or in combination with abdominal surgery was not associated with increased risk of nosocomial Salmonella infection.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Abdominal surgery was identified as a risk factor for nosocomial Salmonella infections in horses. Horses that undergo abdominal surgery require enhanced infection control and preventative care. Risk of nosocomial Salmonella infections may be reduced by implementation of biosecurity measures (such as the use of plastic boots, gloves, and footbaths) immediately after surgery.

Abstract

Objective—To examine the relationship between abdominal surgery and nosocomial Salmonella infections and the relationship between high caseload in combination with abdominal surgery and nosocomial Salmonella infections in hospitalized horses with signs of gastrointestinal tract disease.

Animals—140 horses.

Design—Case-control study.

Procedures—To accomplish the first objective, 1 to 4 control horses were matched with each nosocomial case horse on the basis of admission date of a primary case horse. The frequency of abdominal surgery and other investigated exposure factors were compared between nosocomial case horses and control horses. For the second objective, 4 control horses were matched with each nosocomial case horse on the basis of year of admission. The frequency of high caseload (≥ 26 inpatients), abdominal surgery, and other factors was compared between nosocomial case horses and control horses.

Results—The odds of nosocomial Salmonella infection were 8 times as high (odds ratio = 8.2; 95% confidence interval = 1.11, 60.24) in horses that underwent abdominal surgery, compared with the odds for horses that did not undergo surgery. High caseload alone or in combination with abdominal surgery was not associated with increased risk of nosocomial Salmonella infection.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Abdominal surgery was identified as a risk factor for nosocomial Salmonella infections in horses. Horses that undergo abdominal surgery require enhanced infection control and preventative care. Risk of nosocomial Salmonella infections may be reduced by implementation of biosecurity measures (such as the use of plastic boots, gloves, and footbaths) immediately after surgery.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 406 0 0
Full Text Views 1014 874 259
PDF Downloads 230 105 10
Advertisement