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Osteolysis of the radius and ulna induced by a circumferential foreign body in a cat

Brigitte A. Brisson DMV, DVSc, DACVS1 and Marie-Claude Théoret DMV, DACVS2
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.

Abstract

Case Description—A 1-year-old neutered male cat was examined because of a 6-month history of recurrent swelling and draining wounds affecting the craniomedial aspect of the distal portion of the left forelimb.

Clinical Findings—No lameness or neurologic deficits were evident. Examination of craniocaudal and lateromedial radiographic views revealed nonprogressive circumferential osteolysis and a mildly radiopaque, ring-shaped foreign body surrounding the radius and ulna.

Treatment and Outcome—During surgery, a tight elastic band surrounded by a thick fibrous tissue capsule was found encircling the limb. Microbial culture yielded a Staphylococcus sp that was susceptible to clindamycin. Follow-up monitoring via telephone communication with the owners 1.5 years after removal of the foreign body indicated that the cat had healed with no recurrence of drainage.

Clinical Relevance—Pressure osteolysis of the bones of the forelimb can be caused by a circumferential foreign body without associated neurologic abnormalities or lameness.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Théoret's present address is Surgical and Veterinary Services, 660 Dovercourt Ave, Ottawa, ON K2A 0W3, Canada.

Address correspondence to Dr. Brisson.