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Outcome of laryngeal web resection with mucosal apposition for treatment of airway obstruction in dogs: 15 cases (1992–2006)

Margo L. Mehl DVM, DACVS1, Andrew E. Kyles DVM, PhD, DACVS2, Bruno H. Pypendop DrMedVet, DrVetSci, DACVA3, Dean E. Filipowicz DVM4, and Clare R. Gregory DVM, DACVS5
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  • 1 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 4 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 5 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate long-term clinical outcome in dogs with upper airway obstruction treated with laryngeal web resection and mucosal apposition.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—15 client-owned dogs with laryngeal web formation.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with laryngeal webs treated with a single procedure of web resection with mucosal apposition by use of a ventral laryngotomy were reviewed. Signalment, history, clinical signs, intraoperative complications, postoperative complications, and hospitalization time were recorded. Owners were interviewed 6 months to 6 years after surgery.

Results—Most dogs had a history of oral ventriculocordectomy. Duration of clinical signs ranged from 3 months to 3 years. The most common clinical sign reported was exercise intolerance. Postoperative complications were observed in 4 dogs. Follow-up information was available in 10 dogs, and clinical outcome was classified as excellent in 7 and good in 3.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A single surgical procedure of web resection with mucosal apposition for the treatment of laryngeal web formation in dogs resulted in low morbidity and was associated with a good to excellent outcome.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate long-term clinical outcome in dogs with upper airway obstruction treated with laryngeal web resection and mucosal apposition.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—15 client-owned dogs with laryngeal web formation.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with laryngeal webs treated with a single procedure of web resection with mucosal apposition by use of a ventral laryngotomy were reviewed. Signalment, history, clinical signs, intraoperative complications, postoperative complications, and hospitalization time were recorded. Owners were interviewed 6 months to 6 years after surgery.

Results—Most dogs had a history of oral ventriculocordectomy. Duration of clinical signs ranged from 3 months to 3 years. The most common clinical sign reported was exercise intolerance. Postoperative complications were observed in 4 dogs. Follow-up information was available in 10 dogs, and clinical outcome was classified as excellent in 7 and good in 3.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A single surgical procedure of web resection with mucosal apposition for the treatment of laryngeal web formation in dogs resulted in low morbidity and was associated with a good to excellent outcome.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Mehl's present address is San Francisco Veterinary Specialists, 600 Alabama, San Francisco, CA 94110.

Dr. Kyle's present address is NYC Veterinary Specialists, 410 W 55th St, New York, NY 10019.

Dr. Filipowicz's present address is Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061.

Dr. Gregory's present address is Pet Care Veterinary Hospital, 1370 Fulton Rd, Santa Rosa, CA 95401.

Presented at the 3rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Veterinary Soft Tissue Surgery, Gatlinburg, Tenn, June 2004.

Address correspondence to Dr. Mehl.