Effect of intranasal oxygen administration on blood gas variables and outcome in neonatal calves with respiratory distress syndrome: 20 cases (2004–2006)

Ulrich T. Bleul Clinic of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Farm Animals, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.

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Barbara M. Bircher Clinic of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Farm Animals, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.

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Wolfgang K. Kähn Clinic of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Farm Animals, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of intranasal oxygen administration on blood gas variables and outcome in neonatal calves with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—20 neonatal calves with RDS.

Procedures—Arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) before and after intranasal administration of oxygen were analyzed.

Results—There were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 in the first 24 hours after oxygen administration was begun, with mean ± SD PaO2 increasing from 38.4 ± 8.8 mm Hg to 58.7 ± 17.8 mm Hg during the first 3 hours of treatment. Calves with PaO2 > 55 mm Hg within the first 12 hours after oxygen administration was begun had a significantly higher survival rate (9/10) than did calves that did not reach this threshold (4/10).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that intranasal oxygen administration was a simple method of improving blood gas variables in neonatal calves with RDS and that PaO2 could be used to predict outcome.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of intranasal oxygen administration on blood gas variables and outcome in neonatal calves with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—20 neonatal calves with RDS.

Procedures—Arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) before and after intranasal administration of oxygen were analyzed.

Results—There were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 in the first 24 hours after oxygen administration was begun, with mean ± SD PaO2 increasing from 38.4 ± 8.8 mm Hg to 58.7 ± 17.8 mm Hg during the first 3 hours of treatment. Calves with PaO2 > 55 mm Hg within the first 12 hours after oxygen administration was begun had a significantly higher survival rate (9/10) than did calves that did not reach this threshold (4/10).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that intranasal oxygen administration was a simple method of improving blood gas variables in neonatal calves with RDS and that PaO2 could be used to predict outcome.

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