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Evaluation of twice-daily, low-dose trilostane treatment administered orally in dogs with naturally occurring hyperadrenocorticism

Matthew A. Vaughan DVM1, Edward C. Feldman DVM, DACVIM2, Bruce R. Hoar DVM, MVSc, PhD3, and Richard W. Nelson DVM, DACVIM4
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  • 1 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital and the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital and the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital and the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 4 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital and the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of twice-daily oral administration of a low-dose of trilostane treatment and assess the duration of effects after once-daily trilostane administration in dogs with naturally occurring hyperadrenocorticism (NOH).

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—28 dogs with NOH.

Procedures—22 dogs received 0.5 to 2.5 mg of trilostane/kg (0.23 to 1.14 mg/lb) orally every 12 hours initially. At intervals, dogs were reevaluated; owner assessment of treatment response was recorded. To assess drug effect duration, 16 of the 22 dogs and 6 additional dogs underwent 2 ACTH stimulation tests 3 to 4 hours and 8 to 9 hours after once-daily trilostane administration.

Results—After 1 to 2 weeks, mean trilostane dosage was 1.4 mg/kg (0.64 mg/lb) every 12 hours (n = 22 dogs; good response [resolution of signs], 8; poor response, 14). Four to 8 weeks later, mean dosage was 1.8 mg/kg (0.82 mg/lb) every 12 or 8 hours (n = 21 and 1 dogs, respectively; good response, 15; poor response, 5; 2 dogs were ill). Eight to 16 weeks after the second reevaluation, remaining dogs had good responses (mean dosages, 1.9 mg/kg [0.86 mg/lb], q 12 h [n = 13 dogs] and 1.3 mg/kg [0.59 mg/lb], q 8 h [3]). At 3 to 4 hours and 8 to 9 hours after once-daily dosing, mean post-ACTH stimulation serum cortisol concentrations were 2.60 and 8.09 μg/dL, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs with NOH, administration of trilostane at low doses every 12 hours was effective, although 2 dogs became ill during treatment. Drug effects diminished within 8 to 9 hours. Because of potential adverse effects, lower doses should be evaluated.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of twice-daily oral administration of a low-dose of trilostane treatment and assess the duration of effects after once-daily trilostane administration in dogs with naturally occurring hyperadrenocorticism (NOH).

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—28 dogs with NOH.

Procedures—22 dogs received 0.5 to 2.5 mg of trilostane/kg (0.23 to 1.14 mg/lb) orally every 12 hours initially. At intervals, dogs were reevaluated; owner assessment of treatment response was recorded. To assess drug effect duration, 16 of the 22 dogs and 6 additional dogs underwent 2 ACTH stimulation tests 3 to 4 hours and 8 to 9 hours after once-daily trilostane administration.

Results—After 1 to 2 weeks, mean trilostane dosage was 1.4 mg/kg (0.64 mg/lb) every 12 hours (n = 22 dogs; good response [resolution of signs], 8; poor response, 14). Four to 8 weeks later, mean dosage was 1.8 mg/kg (0.82 mg/lb) every 12 or 8 hours (n = 21 and 1 dogs, respectively; good response, 15; poor response, 5; 2 dogs were ill). Eight to 16 weeks after the second reevaluation, remaining dogs had good responses (mean dosages, 1.9 mg/kg [0.86 mg/lb], q 12 h [n = 13 dogs] and 1.3 mg/kg [0.59 mg/lb], q 8 h [3]). At 3 to 4 hours and 8 to 9 hours after once-daily dosing, mean post-ACTH stimulation serum cortisol concentrations were 2.60 and 8.09 μg/dL, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs with NOH, administration of trilostane at low doses every 12 hours was effective, although 2 dogs became ill during treatment. Drug effects diminished within 8 to 9 hours. Because of potential adverse effects, lower doses should be evaluated.

Contributor Notes

Supported in part by a donation from Ruth Johnston, San Mateo, Calif.

Address correspondence to Dr. Feldman.