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West Nile virus

Rosalie T. Trevejo DVM, MPVM, PhD, DACVPM1 and Millicent Eidson MA, DVM, DACVPM2
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  • 1 Epidemiology Specialty and the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians the College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766-1854.
  • | 2 New York State Department of Health Zoonoses Program, 621 Corning Tower, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237. Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University at Albany, Albany, NY 12144-3456.

Contributor Notes

Supported in part by grants from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the University of Arizona.

The authors thank Drs. Laura Kramer and Susan Wong for laboratory support and Dr. Dennis White and Bryon Backenson for human and mosquito surveillance data.

Address correspondence to Dr. Trevejo.